Tag Archives: storage

The difference between plastic vs cardboard storage boxes

The difference between plastic vs cardboard storage boxesWhat’s best for storage and shipping; plastic or cardboard storage boxes? Well, it all depends on what you want to store or ship and how you want to store and ship it. In this article we take a look at the different kinds of cardboard and plastic storage boxes available and explain why different materials suit different purposes.

The difference between plastic vs cardboard storage boxes

What are the differences between plastic vs cardboard storage boxes? For anyone remotely connected with shipping, packing or storage, the debate is timeless and all depends on what you are wanting to use them for, as well as personal preference.

On the one hand, cardboard storage boxes are tough and strong, easy to label, cost-efficient and can be recycled. On the other, plastic storage boxes offer a durable, water-resistant, strong and reusable alternative. How do you choose?

Cardboard boxes vs plastic boxes

Deciding on which is better, cardboard boxes or plastic boxes, really does come down to what you are looking to do with the box – and perhaps what you might want to do with the box after you have used it.

And you may be surprised by how environmentally-friendly each is when considered across its lifetime.

For starters, let’s look at cardboard storage boxes with lids. These offer protection for goods and items and, to a limited extent, can be stacked up securely. They are easy to label and, can be extremely cost efficient.

Cardboard storage boxes can be used for a wide range of uses. They can be used for sending fragile items through the post, be it books, mugs, DVDs and more. They can, with the right inserts, also be used to ship and store wine bottles, leveraging the natural protective qualities of strong cardboard to protect the contents.

In fact, cardboard boxes come in such a large variety of shapes and sizes – and with a cornucopia of opens and flaps – that they can be used for almost any storage or shipping purpose. There are long boxes, flat boxes, pallet boxes for stacking on pallets, as well as boxes for shipping and even specialist uses. You can even tailor your box to your product with our adjustable and telescopic cardboard boxes.

Choice of telescopic boxes

Telescopic boxes offer a customisable solution for storage, packaging and shipping

You can also use cardboard boxes to store – or indeed ship – documents, as well as cardboard boxes for archiving and even for easy access to goods through special openings.

There are also a wide variety of very specialist boxes for posters and even for clothes. Either being delivered through ecommerce or for storage or house moves.

And of course, there is also a wide variety of large cardboard boxes all sized 600mm+ to help you find the correct size box for your needs. You can even use RAJA’s own sizing tool to work out the best sized box for your goods – but more of that anon.

But cardboard boxes do have their drawbacks. While they are strong and cost effective, they are also limited in their strength and, perhaps more crucially for some storage and shipping options, not waterproof.The difference between plastic and cardboard storage boxes

This is where plastic storage boxes with lids come in. Plastic storage containers are more costly per unit – but they offer some advantages over cardboard boxes

For starters, plastic storage bins and boxes are generally stronger than their cardboard counterparts and, as a result, can be stacked higher. They can also hold heavier and more awkward items.

The main advantage, however, of plastic over cardboard is that it is waterproof and so is ideal for the storage of items that need extra protection from moisture or other environmental contaminants.

As a result plastic storage boxes can be used to store and ship all manner of small to medium duty items that need to be kept water tight and protected. The boxes with lids can be stacked and, when not in use and with the lids removed, can be nested.

For heavier duty storage and transportation, extra-tough, heavy-duty storage boxes that protect from impact as well as water and other environmental factors can also be used – offering a highly-reliable form of protection for a wide range of goods.

Plastic containers can also be used to store smaller, more delicate items, such as small components, stationery or other goods. Here plastic offers a resilient option that can be reused over and over again, where perhaps a cardboard alternative would wear out.

However, while plastic storage containers have a wide variety of uses and offer a greater degree of reuse, they are not so suitable for some applications. Plastic bins and containers are good for storage and shipping, but are often too expensive for one-off use in last mile delivery. In other words, you won’t find your Amazon book being delivered in a plastic box.

That said, some delivery businesses are toying with plastic – if they can get the boxes back. Plastic boxes, on the face of it, may seem to be less environmentally friendly than cardboard. However, if plastic boxes can be reused numerous times, they start to be less environmentally impactful. Recycling takes a lot of energy – even for paper – so getting more use out of a container can be more efficient, if you can sort out collection.

Types of cardboard storage boxes

While there are advantages to using cardboard or plastic storage boxes, depending on what you want to store where, let us focus for now on cardboard storage boxes, as they come in so many different shapes and sizes.

While for heavy duty and heavy weight storage and shipping needs, plastic is a clear winner, cardboard boxes aren’t as wimpish as you’d think, coming as they do in a wide variety of thicknesses.

For starters, there are single wall cardboard boxes, which are made of a single layer of tough corrugated cardboard and offer robust protection for your products with superior resistance to bursting, humidity and temperature change; in addition tapes adhere perfectly to the surface. The corrugated cardboard and puncture resistant Kraft outer works hard to secure your items, while still maintaining a smooth and clean finish for your adhesive address labels to stick to.

Single wall cardboard boxes

Singled wall cardboard boxes are strong, light and low cost way to store a wide range of items

These boxes are ideal for storing, packing and shipping of products and goods and are delivered flat packed for easy storage and transport.

Double wall cardboard boxes

Double wall cardboard boxes are tougher still for stacking and shipping of fragile objects

If that isn’t enough, there are also a wide range of double wall cardboard boxes, which are designed to be tough still. Double walled cardboard boxes are made from two layers of rigid corrugated fluting with a tough puncture resistant Kraft outer lining. This means that the double wall cardboard box retains its shape during shipping or storage and offers superior strength and durability over single wall cardboard boxes.

These sturdy boxes are suitable for a wide range of products from glassware, household fixtures and fittings to small electrical goods and can be stacked.

Triple wall cardboard boxes

Triple walled storage offers a really tough way to store and ship even the heaviest items

If you need a really strong storage and shipping box, triple wall cardboard boxes have you covered. Manufactured from top quality rigid flute corrugated board with a 200gsm Kraft paper finish, these are ideal for heavy duty items such as metal parts, compressors, boilers, pumps, industrial tools and machinery. Recommended for shipping and exporting.

In fact, these boxes has been especially designed for metal parts, compressors, boilers, pumps, industrial tools and machinery our heavy duty triple wall boxes with a weight capacity of up to 500kg also come flat-packed for easy, space saving storage in your warehouse.

Conclusions

The debate over whether cardboard or plastic makes for a better storage box is not really a debate at all: it all depends on what you want to store, ship or archive. For heavy duty, long term storage, or to store things that are in repeat use, plastic storage boxes have the edge as their higher price delivers more value over time.

However, for one off shipping cardboard has the edge. With cardboard storage boxes coming in a variety of sizes and thicknesses, they offer the ability to ship and protect anything from a book right up to a compressor. The only thing that ‘weakens’ the case for cardboard is that it isn’t waterproof like plastic.

That said, which you want to use comes down to what you are packaging and what you want to do with it. There is a vast array of solutions to choose from – and we can help you choose.

Want to know more about the wide range of cardboard and plastic storage boxes?

For additional advice on storage boxes in all their myriad shapes, sizes and materials to meet all your packaging, storage and shipping needs, our Packaging Experts are here to help you find the right solutions and arrange next day delivery. Simply call us on 0800 542 44 28 or visit www.rajapack.co.uk.

 

Can de-cluttering bring Brits a better life?

The de-cluttering craze is everywhere right now; as the focus of countless self-help books, the mainstay of many organisation gurus – and even the subject of a popular Netflix series. It’s also been the inspiration behind motivational quotes like Marie Kondo’s: “Discard everything that does not spark joy”.

This philosophy is a popular one: the promise that we can maximise our lives with a minimalist lifestyle. But, by putting our old belongings into cardboard boxes and bidding them farewell, can we really put more meaning into our lives?

We wanted to find out what Brits make of this movement, and whether they’ve felt a benefit from a purge of their possessions. To do this, we surveyed over 1,000 respondents on their attitudes to de-cluttering food, fashion and technology products in their homes.

How much are Brits wasting on food, fashion and technology?

RAJA de-cluttering: How much do Brits waste per year

First, we had to determine if there was a need to de-clutter. The answer? Yes.

We found that, on average, Brits are wasting a quarter of the food, fashion and technology items that they buy in one year.

Altogether, that’s over £400 that could be spent elsewhere (and that’s not including the space they could be saving, too!). How would you feel about an all-inclusive weekend away, giving more generously to charity or simply splashing out on family and friends? There are plenty of ways you could use this spare cash – and all without accumulating any waste.

On the topic of waste, what, if anything, are Brits doing with their old belongings? We discovered that 19% (almost one in five Brits!) do not de-clutter at all – which is 5.2M if we applied this figure across all over-16’s in Britain. Do many of us simply hold the habits of a hoarder, or is there another reason we cannot let go?

Why are we holding onto our old belongings?

One of the main reasons that respondents said they didn’t de-clutter is because they’re emotionally attached to their belongings (20% of Brits say so). For many of us, our sense of self is wrapped up in our possessions. Whether our ‘things’ remind us of past relationships or help bring back fond memories of childhood, the sentimental value of certain items often outweighs the cost. Surprisingly, more millennials hold emotional attachments to their belongings than other generations, going against the assumption that they choose experiences over “things”.

Finally, not fully understanding how to dispose of or recycle our food, fashion and tech is a major factor that stops us from saying goodbye to our things. Over half of the British public (51%) say they don’t know how to confidently dispose of their tech, crowning this as the most complex thing to de-clutter correctly, followed by fashion (41%) and food (38%).

How can we breathe new life into old belongings?

RAJA de-cluttering: What do Brits do with their old belongings

And yet, 4 in 5 of us do de-clutter – so what are we doing with our “stuff”?

It turns out Brits are a charitable lot, with over half of respondents (55%) donating their pre-loved possessions to charities and over a quarter of them (26%) are handing down their belongings to friends and family.

Brits are crafty with their possessions, too. We found out that 37% either recycle or upcycle their products –both of which help your belongings go further for longer. Recycling helps turn waste into a reusable material or product, while upcycling turns waste into something of a higher quality than before. Whether it’s turning a ladder into a bookshelf or restoring a bicycle to get it back on the road, many of us are breathing new life into old belongings – and pocketing ourselves with some profit to boot.

Our findings showed that 3 in 10 people are profiting from a side hustle by selling their old belongings, with almost three quarters of 35-54-year olds getting rid of their things this way. With popular selling sites such as eBay, Amazon and GumTree, as well as product-specific sites such as Depop, MusicMagpie and Vinted, there’s plenty of avenues to make some money off our belongings.

How does de-cluttering make Brits feel?

RAJA What are Brits' attitude towards de-cluttering

So, how do we feel when we de-clutter? We asked the 80% of people that said they actively de-clutter at least once per year.

Feeling house-proud is somewhat of a fuel for us Brits. Over half of respondents were motivated to dig out their and de-clutter when they wanted to free up some space, with 34% of them doing it to improve the presentation of their homes and 16% taking this task on when moving home.

We asked Brits to tell us the emotions that they felt when fulfilling this duty, and, although 1 in 10 said that it evoked negative feelings such as distress or feeling overwhelmed, the responses were namely positive:

  • 35% said they find de-cluttering to be a therapeutic experience
  • 27% found it rewarding
  • 16% said they de-clutter because it is beneficial to their mental health

When Brits de-clutter their home, they’re also de-cluttering their mind and gaining some emotional benefits.

Want to feel great too? Here are our top tips

Has all of this inspired you to de-clutter your home? Or perhaps you do de-clutter, but are in the quarter of Brits that admit to simply throwing things away when you do? There are many benefits that can come from de-cluttering, and even more so when you do it right.

De-cluttering is a popular trend, but our environment transcends any fads – it’s our future.

With that in mind, here are some of our top tips on how to de-clutter in a way that is sustainable and gives our belongings added life.

RAJA de-cluttering: Almost 20 percent of Brits do not de-clutter their home

So, next time you’re debating whether to de-clutter, consider the benefits that it can have to your wellbeing, your home, the planet (when done properly) and perhaps even your profits. Why not prepare for your next big clear out with our huge range of quality cardboard boxes for all your sorting and storage needs, and the great news is that they’re made from a minimum of 75% recycled contents.