The difference between plastic vs cardboard storage boxes

The difference between plastic vs cardboard storage boxesWhat’s best for storage and shipping; plastic or cardboard storage boxes? Well, it all depends on what you want to store or ship and how you want to store and ship it. In this article we take a look at the different kinds of cardboard and plastic storage boxes available and explain why different materials suit different purposes.

The difference between plastic vs cardboard storage boxes

What are the differences between plastic vs cardboard storage boxes? For anyone remotely connected with shipping, packing or storage, the debate is timeless and all depends on what you are wanting to use them for, as well as personal preference.

On the one hand, cardboard storage boxes are tough and strong, easy to label, cost-efficient and can be recycled. On the other, plastic storage boxes offer a durable, water-resistant, strong and reusable alternative. How do you choose?

Cardboard boxes vs plastic boxes

Deciding on which is better, cardboard boxes or plastic boxes, really does come down to what you are looking to do with the box – and perhaps what you might want to do with the box after you have used it.

And you may be surprised by how environmentally-friendly each is when considered across its lifetime.

For starters, let’s look at cardboard storage boxes with lids. These offer protection for goods and items and, to a limited extent, can be stacked up securely. They are easy to label and, can be extremely cost efficient.

Cardboard storage boxes can be used for a wide range of uses. They can be used for sending fragile items through the post, be it books, mugs, DVDs and more. They can, with the right inserts, also be used to ship and store wine bottles, leveraging the natural protective qualities of strong cardboard to protect the contents.

In fact, cardboard boxes come in such a large variety of shapes and sizes – and with a cornucopia of opens and flaps – that they can be used for almost any storage or shipping purpose. There are long boxes, flat boxes, pallet boxes for stacking on pallets, as well as boxes for shipping and even specialist uses. You can even tailor your box to your product with our adjustable and telescopic cardboard boxes.

Choice of telescopic boxes

Telescopic boxes offer a customisable solution for storage, packaging and shipping

You can also use cardboard boxes to store – or indeed ship – documents, as well as cardboard boxes for archiving and even for easy access to goods through special openings.

There are also a wide variety of very specialist boxes for posters and even for clothes. Either being delivered through ecommerce or for storage or house moves.

And of course, there is also a wide variety of large cardboard boxes all sized 600mm+ to help you find the correct size box for your needs. You can even use RAJA’s own sizing tool to work out the best sized box for your goods – but more of that anon.

But cardboard boxes do have their drawbacks. While they are strong and cost effective, they are also limited in their strength and, perhaps more crucially for some storage and shipping options, not waterproof.The difference between plastic and cardboard storage boxes

This is where plastic storage boxes with lids come in. Plastic storage containers are more costly per unit – but they offer some advantages over cardboard boxes

For starters, plastic storage bins and boxes are generally stronger than their cardboard counterparts and, as a result, can be stacked higher. They can also hold heavier and more awkward items.

The main advantage, however, of plastic over cardboard is that it is waterproof and so is ideal for the storage of items that need extra protection from moisture or other environmental contaminants.

As a result plastic storage boxes can be used to store and ship all manner of small to medium duty items that need to be kept water tight and protected. The boxes with lids can be stacked and, when not in use and with the lids removed, can be nested.

For heavier duty storage and transportation, extra-tough, heavy-duty storage boxes that protect from impact as well as water and other environmental factors can also be used – offering a highly-reliable form of protection for a wide range of goods.

Plastic containers can also be used to store smaller, more delicate items, such as small components, stationery or other goods. Here plastic offers a resilient option that can be reused over and over again, where perhaps a cardboard alternative would wear out.

However, while plastic storage containers have a wide variety of uses and offer a greater degree of reuse, they are not so suitable for some applications. Plastic bins and containers are good for storage and shipping, but are often too expensive for one-off use in last mile delivery. In other words, you won’t find your Amazon book being delivered in a plastic box.

That said, some delivery businesses are toying with plastic – if they can get the boxes back. Plastic boxes, on the face of it, may seem to be less environmentally friendly than cardboard. However, if plastic boxes can be reused numerous times, they start to be less environmentally impactful. Recycling takes a lot of energy – even for paper – so getting more use out of a container can be more efficient, if you can sort out collection.

Types of cardboard storage boxes

While there are advantages to using cardboard or plastic storage boxes, depending on what you want to store where, let us focus for now on cardboard storage boxes, as they come in so many different shapes and sizes.

While for heavy duty and heavy weight storage and shipping needs, plastic is a clear winner, cardboard boxes aren’t as wimpish as you’d think, coming as they do in a wide variety of thicknesses.

For starters, there are single wall cardboard boxes, which are made of a single layer of tough corrugated cardboard and offer robust protection for your products with superior resistance to bursting, humidity and temperature change; in addition tapes adhere perfectly to the surface. The corrugated cardboard and puncture resistant Kraft outer works hard to secure your items, while still maintaining a smooth and clean finish for your adhesive address labels to stick to.

Single wall cardboard boxes

Singled wall cardboard boxes are strong, light and low cost way to store a wide range of items

These boxes are ideal for storing, packing and shipping of products and goods and are delivered flat packed for easy storage and transport.

Double wall cardboard boxes

Double wall cardboard boxes are tougher still for stacking and shipping of fragile objects

If that isn’t enough, there are also a wide range of double wall cardboard boxes, which are designed to be tough still. Double walled cardboard boxes are made from two layers of rigid corrugated fluting with a tough puncture resistant Kraft outer lining. This means that the double wall cardboard box retains its shape during shipping or storage and offers superior strength and durability over single wall cardboard boxes.

These sturdy boxes are suitable for a wide range of products from glassware, household fixtures and fittings to small electrical goods and can be stacked.

Triple wall cardboard boxes

Triple walled storage offers a really tough way to store and ship even the heaviest items

If you need a really strong storage and shipping box, triple wall cardboard boxes have you covered. Manufactured from top quality rigid flute corrugated board with a 200gsm Kraft paper finish, these are ideal for heavy duty items such as metal parts, compressors, boilers, pumps, industrial tools and machinery. Recommended for shipping and exporting.

In fact, these boxes has been especially designed for metal parts, compressors, boilers, pumps, industrial tools and machinery our heavy duty triple wall boxes with a weight capacity of up to 500kg also come flat-packed for easy, space saving storage in your warehouse.

Conclusions

The debate over whether cardboard or plastic makes for a better storage box is not really a debate at all: it all depends on what you want to store, ship or archive. For heavy duty, long term storage, or to store things that are in repeat use, plastic storage boxes have the edge as their higher price delivers more value over time.

However, for one off shipping cardboard has the edge. With cardboard storage boxes coming in a variety of sizes and thicknesses, they offer the ability to ship and protect anything from a book right up to a compressor. The only thing that ‘weakens’ the case for cardboard is that it isn’t waterproof like plastic.

That said, which you want to use comes down to what you are packaging and what you want to do with it. There is a vast array of solutions to choose from – and we can help you choose.

Want to know more about the wide range of cardboard and plastic storage boxes?

For additional advice on storage boxes in all their myriad shapes, sizes and materials to meet all your packaging, storage and shipping needs, our Packaging Experts are here to help you find the right solutions and arrange next day delivery. Simply call us on 0800 542 44 28 or visit www.rajapack.co.uk.

 

Inspiring women, inspired to give

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici, businesswomen and philanthropist

The history of the packaging company RAJA, is an empowering family story that spans over 60 years. One of courage, dexterity and determination.

The packaging industry is still regarded as a male dominated industry, and especially after World War II during the time of a male led society – the everyday struggles women encountered were overlooked and were socially accepted. Despite this, two women saw an opportunity and instead of letting the economies of post-war France and businessmen deter them, they persevered.

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici, the RAJA Group

Inspiring women

During the Second World War, Rosie the Riveter was the iconic feminist symbol (and still is) of the female wartime workforce which was the turning point for women. Although the typical gender roles meant that post war, women were expected to give up their industrious jobs and, naturally return to their housekeeping duties.

In 1954, Rachel Marcovici and her friend, Janine Rocher founded Cartons RAJA in France. The concept was simple, resell used cardboard boxes, not only was it cheaper but it meant reusing what materials were available. Rachel organised the business operations, sought meetings with buyers, negotiated and made the deals. She was a successful women in business and an established business owner that carved out a flourishing profession in the packaging supply and distribution chain.

Since then, a lot has changed but what has remained strong throughout the company are the ethics of a businesswomen and the key foundations which continue to this day.

Today, Danièle Kapel-Marcovici is the CEO of the company, now called RAJA Group (the headquarters is still in France). She is the daughter of Rachel Marcovici, and has successfully continue to grow the company with the same passion as her mother. Now RAJA has presence in 18 countries throughout Europe, with 21 subsidiaries of a turnover of more than €631 million in 2018. The RAJA Group has more than 1900 employees, and this year recently acquired Staples Solutions business units in France, Spain and Italy. The RAJA Group will have 3,000 employees and will have an expected turnover of €1 billion.

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici - the RAJA packaging headquarters

Inspired to give

In 1982, when Danièle’s parents entrusted her with the family firm, she not only continued her mother’s journey in the business world, but with the same beliefs to seek equal rights for women all over the world.

Influenced by her mother’s life, Danièle’s views came to realisation in 2006 when the RAJA-Danièle Marcovici Foundation (known as the RAJA Foundation) was founded. Dedicated to the empowerment of women around the world, the organisation has since supported over 440 female-centric charity projects in more than 50 countries. More than 90,000 women have benefited from the activities of the RAJA Foundation, and it has also dedicated over €9 million for its cause.

Danièle shares her opinion on why the feminist movement matters, the need for corporations to balance business with philanthropy, and her vision for the foundation.

As the CEO of a for-profit corporation, what inspired you to start a charity?

I have always been a committed woman to such causes and, since the 1970s, have led a personal and shared struggle for feminist awareness. Women should be free to choose, have the same rights, the same recognition and the same status as men in society.

I also believe that, in addition to their economic role, companies have a role to play in the society. That is why I created the RAJA-Danièle Marcovici Foundation in 2006, under the aegis of the Fondation de France (a French philanthropic network), to support organisations that work for the empowerment of women and the improvement of their living conditions.

The foundation supports projects throughout the world that contribute to women’s education, social action, abuse and violence against women, training and professional integration. The RAJA Foundation was one of the first in France to commit to this cause, and it’s funded by the RAJA Group.

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici

There are many groups in the world that need help. Why does the feminist movement in particular mean so much to you?

Women are the first victims of inequality in the world. They perform two-thirds of international work but earn only 10% of the income. 70% of people living on less than 76p (€0.89) per day in the world are women, and one in three women is a victim of violence during her lifetime.

It is essential to support actions that empower women and reduce the inequalities they face. Women need equal access to education and to professional opportunities; they deserve the same pay and the same freedoms as men. Investing in equality is the best investment for achieving global political stability and economic development.

How can a for-profit corporation uphold and support the values of its not-for-profit activities?

Since I took over the leadership of RAJA Group from my mother when I was 36, I have led the group with respect for professional and wage equality between women and men. The company refuses all forms of sexism and has strong values of solidarity and respect.

The social commitment of RAJA Group reinforces the purpose our employees feel in their professional lives. In 2013, I created the programme RAJApeople, which allows employees to get involved with the RAJA Foundation in different ways.

An employee can choose to have their salary rounded up to the nearest euro so that the difference between this and their actual salary becomes a monthly micro donation that goes to the foundation.

They can also volunteer with the foundation, sponsor a project, or take part in events that are organised throughout the year.

The company also organises events in France and in our European subsidiaries on 8th March, which is International Women’s Day, and November 25, International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

Most recently, we were a partner of the first feminist eco-festival in France.

Why is the fight for women’s rights still necessary in developed regions?

SOL - RAJA Foundation

Any progress made is still too slow and uneven, and political will and financial support remain inadequate. The movements launched in 2017, such as Me Too, have highlighted that the problem of violence against women remains a reality in many countries – even in France.

In 2017, one French woman was killed every 2.8 days by her partner or ex-partner, yet only a third of them were identified as victims by the police or those close to them.

In addition, the news constantly shows that many rights remain to be won and those that have been obtained are regularly challenged in an era marked by the rise of individualism, conservatism and obscurantism.

In authoritarian regimes, war and even any questioning of democracy, women are the first to be affected and their rights are the first to be ignored. In Europe, many countries are now questioning women’s right for abortion by limiting it or making access difficult. A few of those countries are Ireland, Poland and Spain.

Saveurs en partage - the RAJA Foundation

Even in France, where men and women are said to have equal rights under the law and its application, there is still a gap and the conditions for female emancipation are far from being fully acquired.

What aspects of the fight for women’s rights continue to require attention?

Women continue to suffer discrimination and violence regardless of their age, nationality or religion. There are still women who are not allowed to drive, who are excluded from inheritance or the right to own land. Girls are deprived of education simply because of their gender and, in some regions, are still being forced into arranged marriages.

Acting to improve the status of women around the world remains a priority for me. The RAJA Foundation will continue its mission to advance the rights of women in France and in all regions for the world for as long as inequalities persist.

GERES - the RAJA Foundation

In contrast, what are some of the changes that deserve to be lauded?

There has been some progress made and the status of women has improved in many respects in both developed and less developed countries. When my mother was young, she was not allowed to vote. When she founded RAJA Group in 1954, women were still not allowed to open a bank account or practise a profession without permission from their husbands. At the beginning of my career, there was no law that guaranteed equal pay for women and men for work of equal value. Now, all these have changed.

What are your goals for the foundation in the next five years?

My ambition is to make the RAJA Foundation a think tank for women’s rights. I have committed the foundation to three complementary missions – to financially support relevant projects, involve the employees of RAJA Group as well as to denounce, inform and contribute to advocacy to overcome inequalities. As part of the last mission, the foundation develops women’s rights awareness programs that it shares with different audiences.

I also launched the RAJA Women’s Awards in 2013 to promote and commend exemplary actions and projects taken and led by the organisations with whom the Foundation works. I aim to facilitate the exchange of experiences among all those involved in the feminist cause to improve the effectiveness of actions and to contribute to the development of everyone involved.

The Foundation will continue to support the organisations it works with and encourage our employees to get involved in its activities. I want its voice to be heard on different platforms where gender issues and women’s rights are discussed, at both national and international events.

Raising awareness of the Foundation is also a priority. It has a website (fondation-RAJA-marcovici.com) where we present the organisations and projects that we are supporting. RAJA Group also communicates regularly with its network of suppliers, customers and other stakeholders about the foundation’s activities.

What are some of your most memorable moments with the RAJA Foundation?

Every RAJA Women’s Awards ceremony, where more than 400 people gather to recognise exemplary projects carried out by different organisations supported by the foundation, is emotional for me.

My visit to Northern India in 2017 with an organisation that the foundation has supported for many years is also a highlight. I was able to meet local women as well as the renowned female Indian scholar and environmental activist Vandana Shiva.

Interview source: theceomagazine.com

2019 Christmas delivery times

Our Packaging Specialists will be available from 8.30am on 24th, 27th, 30th and 31st of December – our telephone lines will have reduced operating hours. Orders placed during this time will be delivered from the 3rd January 2020. Normal RAJA operating hours will resume from 8am 2nd January 2020.

2019 Christmas delivery times2019 Christmas delivery times

PLEASE NOTE
Orders must be received by 4:30pm for processing, we will aim for next working day services.

For more information on opening hours and delivery, see our delivery page, to contact our Packaging Specialists, you can email sales@rajapack.co.uk or call 0800 542 44 28.

Gifting Etiquette: Exploring Brits’ Gift-Giving Habits

Gifts. What’s not to love, right? From birthdays and anniversaries to holidays and baby arrivals, we’ll find any excuse to slip a gift into a special occasion. It’s a tradition that has shone for so long, because while gifts may be material, their overarching message is one of love. Yet, in the age of the conscious consumer, do we still care about traditional gifts?

We surveyed 2,000 Brits to find out more about their gifting etiquette.

Are you someone that loves a special occasion, partly for the purpose of giving and/or receiving gifts? Or, are you someone that would be happy to see this tradition go?

For some, it’s the holy grail of special occasions. Picking out presents and choosing pretty gift boxes, complemented by cards that perfectly represent your nearest and dearest (perhaps with an in-joke or two!?). And of course, on the other side – being the recipient of said gifts.

For others however, these gifts are overrated. Perhaps you’d rather be surrounded by loved ones; lead a ‘greener’ lifestyle with less consumption; or make memories through experiences, rather than give or receive material things.

What’s your stance? It’s time to find out where we stand as a nation on ‘gift-iquette’ in Britain.

What gifts do we want as a nation?

Receiving gifts

We asked Brits what types of gifts they most wanted to receive on a special occasion.

Turns out, cold hard cash was the gift recipients wanted to receive most. Over a quarter of Brits (26%) chose money over anything else. In expensive times with more costs to cover than ever before, are financial pressures causing us to pick the practical choice? Though this was a top pick to receive, it’s often an unpopular one to give – namely because deciding on an amount can be a delicate subject.

Lucky for gift-givers, then, that 74% (almost three quarters) of votes went towards ‘traditional’ gifts, with clothing, technology and beauty products the most popular choices. This means there’s a whole lot of people that still appreciate something picked specially for them, and presumably the act of opening something on their special day. If you’re struggling for

something to buy, take note: out of the above, women preferred to receive clothes (21%) and beauty products (12%), while men preferred to receive technology (23%) and clothes (19%).

We hear a lot of talk about the ‘experiential generation’ but not even 2 in 10 people chose an experiential gift. This could include the likes of a dinner date, a concert ticket or a flying lesson. Finally, only 5% of people chose a gift that goes towards a charitable cause – which, could be anything from donating to a charity on your behalf to sponsoring an endangered animal in your name. Only 13% of Brits wanted nothing at all.

The act of giving and receiving a ‘tangible’ gift still matters

Not only did we clarify that Brits still love a gift, but their gift preferences are still geared towards tangible items, too. Of those that had a preference, we found that 64% of Brits would prefer to receive a physical gift, versus only 17% of those that would opt for something digital.

Interestingly, 43% of Gen Z-ers and Millennials had no preference between a physical or a digital gift, showing they’re not so tied into traditions as the older generation. So, unsurprisingly, 9 in 10 Brits that are 45+ year-old said that they would actively prefer a physical gift over that of a digital one.

When it comes to ‘gift-iquette’, we also found that over a third (36%) of gift givers said they’d possibly feel guilty about not giving a tangible gift – but why?

Gift-giving

When we asked those that said they would feel this way, over half (53%) said it was because they viewed tangible gifts as more thoughtful and personal. This was followed by 37% who stated, “it’s important that the recipient has something tangible to unwrap”, and 28% who said they just do, “because it’s proper social etiquette”. Of course, almost 2 in 10 (18%) said they had to return the gesture when someone has gifted them something tangible, too.

Is a greener way of life changing our ‘gift-iquette’?

Almost 2 in 10 Brits said that they have considered the environmental impact of gifts prior to purchase and have chosen not to buy a gift because of this.

For most however, the perfect gift takes priority: almost half (47%) say that whether they’ve considered the environmental impact or not, this would not deter them from their chosen gifts for a friend, family member or other. This could include anything from a single-serving product to something with excess packaging, or anything that requires batteries that could corrode in our landfills.

This means that when it comes to the gifting process, 30% of us never think about the fact that our gift might be unwanted or wasted. Additionally, we never think about the environmental impact of making and sending greeting cards (38%), wrapping paper (32%) and product packaging (28%).

How to gift sustainably

Sustainable gifting

For those that want to follow traditional ‘gift-iquette’ while still taking steps towards a greener world – here are some handy tips to reduce your carbon footprint, without giving up the joy of gift-giving!

  • Wrapping: When you’re choosing wrapping paper, it’s the shiny ones that are often unrecyclable. This is the same for any paper with metallic, glitter or textured outers, so try to choose recyclable gift paper for wrapping presents.
  • Gift boxes: Many gift boxes are not recyclable due to the materials that they are made of. By having eco gift boxes and bags to hand, you can say no to excess gift packaging pushed by stores, and make sure the gifts you give are packaged in a greener way.
  • Sticky tape: If you want to go all-out green, pick up some eco-responsible tape. It’s made with natural rubber adhesives that can be recycled at the same time as your eco-wrapping paper and gift boxes.
  • Re-using gift bags and boxes: Each year, whether it’s for the holidays, birthdays or other occasions, we’re given a handful of gift bags, gift tags, wrapping paper and more that we can store away. What better way to stay green and save money, by keeping their life cycle going and regifting to someone else?

RAJA offer sustainable alternatives across an extensive range of wrapping and packaging, ensuring to incorporate eco-responsible practices at every step. Take a look at our range of gift boxes, which make for a great option for all your gifting needs.

What is a bag heat sealer?

A bag heat sealer is a packaging machine used to help form a bag, using heat to melt the sides together. Sealing things in their packaging is not only vital to protecting them and keeping them safe in transit, but also makes packaging. Particularly, clear poly bags. And to make that happen, you can use a simple bag heat sealer to close up the open end of a bag – you can even trim the ‘spare’ off to make for an even more professional job.

In this post we shall take a look at how a bag heat sealer works, the different kinds of heat sealers available and what kinds of bags they work on. As well as looking at heat sealing machines that can automate the process for you.

What is a bag heat sealer?

A plastic bag heat sealer is a simple heater that, when pressed and applied to a thermoplastic bag, seals the bag together using a combination of pressure and melting. The two plastic parts are brought together and pressed against one another and heated. This melts the plastic, which co-mingles and, as it cools, sets into a single plastic seam.

A plastic bag heat sealer essentially welds plastic togethe

It is akin to welding, but with plastic. Once cooled the join is essentially one piece of solid, even plastic, contiguous to the rest of the two pieces joined together. In short, it is a water-tight sealed weld between the two.

It can be used to join together two pieces of the same or two similar thermoplastics, such as Polythene of different grades. It Is most commonly found in packaging where it can form a water and dust-tight seal on a bag of pretty much any size.

They typically use a heated element or bar, often covered by a protective Teflon guard, so that the melting plastic doesn’t stick to the element which is pressed onto the plastic at the point where the joint is needed. It takes only a few seconds to seal, but it is a precise process. Too little time and the joint won’t form, too much and the plastic will burn. So most heat sealers feature a light that comes on when the seal is done, or, on more sophisticated heat sealing machines – as we shall see – they lift off when ready.

There are different heat sealing bag devices available . Small, portable/desktop devices for smaller items at low volume; automated devices for sealing many individual items; and continuous heat sealers that seal continually as the item/items run through them.

Some also come with cutters, so that once sealed any excess plastic can be simply trimmed off, or, in the case of continuous sealers, a continuous row of items can be cut individually once sealed.

That’s how they work, but what can they seal?

Can you use a heat sealer on polythene bags?

50 micron layflat tubing, lay-flat tubing is ideal for heat-sealing

You can use a heat sealer on a polythene bag. Most polythene bag heat sealers are used to seal poly bags. The polythene for heat-sealed packaging comes in several forms: it can be supplied as bags, which need just one end sealed; or it can come as a layflat tube, which is like an open ended bag that covers the items and needs then to be heat-sealed shut at both ends.

Low density polyethylene, from which most bags and layflat tubing are made, is ideal for heat sealing as it melts at around 160C. This is hot enough to melt together the two sides and cool enough for it to cool and seal quickly when the heat and pressure is removed.

An added benefit is that, as it cools, the polythene contracts and pulls the seal even tighter. This is one of the key advantages of heat sealers for poly bags.Layflat tubing and dispenser kit

Layflat tubing is available on rolls so that you can continuously package up goods at an industrial scale if needed. It allows the user to create the size of package they need, with the goods simply put inside, the tubing cut to length, then heat sealed. This is ideal if you have a variety of sized objects in your warehouse that need packaging.

125 micron black layflat tubing

It also comes in black, as well as clear and recycled polythene options, with black packaging being ideal for keeping goods not only protected from light when in storage or transit, but also keeping them confidential when sent through the post.

Are there machines for heat sealing plastic bags?

Machines are available for heat sealing plastic bags. One of the easiest ways to package and seal goods using layflat tubing or plastic bags is with a bag heat sealer machine. A heat sealer machine for sealing plastic bags allows you to handle medium to high volumes of goods, making for better and more efficient sealing.

A plastic bag heat sealer machine, such as the Opti-seal industrial heat sealers, offers a simple yet versatile operation with adjustable sealing and cooling times. The compact design of such machines means they can be conveniently placed within reach of workstations, or they can be mounted on an optional stand that also includes a film holder, and afoot pedal for hands free operation.

Opti-sealer heat sealers also has a cutter

Opti-seal industrial heat sealers are impulse sealers, which means the heat is applied via the element wire for only a few seconds to seal the material together. The Opti-seal has a wide range of applications. It can seal a range of films including polythene, polypropylene and PVC with a durable 5mm seal, making this bag sealer the perfect choice for producing and sealing bags, sacks and pouches. Features a safety trimming cutter.

Other heat sealer machines, such as the RAJA Impulse Sealer, offer reliable performance and are ideal for low volume bag sealing. Suitable for layflat tubing or bag widths up to 400 mm wide, these are also impulse sealers that apply heat via the element wire for only a second before the mechanism begins to cool the seal.

Impulse sealer with lay-flat tube roll makes easy work of packagingMost heat sealers have an adjustable timer and a cutter on the sealing arm for leaving a neat finish to your bagged product. There are three sizes of heat sealer available: 200, 300 and 400mm sealing widths which produce a 2mm wide seal. Recommended for two layers of polythene film (PE film), each up to 150 micron (600 gauge) thick.

There are also a broad range of spare Teflon coated heating elements and cutters to make sure that your heat sealing machine stays in tip-top working condition.

Want to know more about our wide range of heat sealers, heat sealer machines, heat sealing bags and layflat tubing?

For additional advice on heat sealers, heat sealer machines, heat sealing bags and layflat tubing, our Packaging Experts are here to help you find the right solutions and arrange next day delivery. Simply contact 0800 542 44 28 or visit www.rajapack.co.uk.

 

Types of foam packaging

There are many types of foam packaging, this material is ideal for protecting delicate items from vibration, abrasion and when something needs some extra cushioning. Available in blocks, which can hold items in place, foam wrap rolls or sheets, which can interleave and cover. Also, foam profiles for edges and corners – and, it can also line the inside of a mailing bag, for postal protection. This lightweight material is versatile and can help to protect all manner of glass, ceramic, and items with a shiny finish, providing a superior shield for scratches and smears.

For added protection and padding, foam is also available as void fill, moulding directly around what is being packaged.

Foam packaging is often overlooked with other popular packaging supplies, such as bubble wrap and bubble bags. Why don’t you take a read of Bubble vs Foam and compare the difference yourself.

So what type of foam protective packaging do you need? Read on…

Why use foam packaging?

There are many reasons to use foam packaging; to protect products from scratches and abrasions when in transit or storage, foam packaging offers an ideal protective packaging solution. Available in rolls, ‘packaging peanuts’, in blocks, in sheets or even as foam bags. Foam packaging rolls can be easily cut to size, and the sheets wrapped around products, or interleaved between products acting as a layered buffer. This flexible material provides ideal cushioning and protection. It is indeed a very versatile packaging material.

Foam is known for protecting glass, polished wood, ceramics – this list goes on! It doesn’t leave any marks, lint or residue. The smooth appearance is clean and professional and can provide a quality presentation to product packaging along with protection.

This spongy foam material is multipurpose and comes in a variety of forms, each suited to a number of jobs. Foam bends and can be shaped – for corners and edges use foam profiles. Also pre-made foam liners are available, with preformed contours ready to insert into the outer packaging, such as a cardboard box, filling the voids. Some blocks and sheets are also available with a self-adhesive backing to stick onto the packaging or goods, making sure to remain where placed. Foam bags on the other hand, once activated, is rigid and instantly moulds, conforming to your product. The Instapak Quick® foam cushion packaging is like a foam bag that encases around your product providing customised foam protection, ideal for packing awkward shaped products.


Recommendation: Have you tried foam postal boxes?

View the range>>


Foam eco-friendly alternatives

An eco-friendly option of foam packaging is biodegradeable loose fill. Loose fill can also be referred to as “packaging peanuts”, resembling little chips. Foam protection doesn’t have to just mean sheets or blocks, it also comes as loose fill; and can be used to place around non-uniform objects in boxes and storage containers filling any voids. While many storage options rely on non-biodegradable polystyrene there is today an eco-friendly protective packaging option called Eco Flo.

Foam packaging, Eco-flo biodegradable loose fill

Eco Flo offers all the protection of other packing fillers and is 100% biodegradable. It is also created from totally renewable sources. As a packaging material it is designed to mould around products and settle immediately when placed in the box preventing the goods from dropping to the bottom of the carton.

Eco Flo is light, clean and odour free, and is 5 times more antistatic than polystyrene chips and it can be used for all products, delicate china, electronic equipment and heavy mechanical goods.

Eco Flo is supplied in 15ft³ bags measuring approximately, height 1200mm, width 620mm, depth 620mm.

Foam packaging, Pelaspan loose fill is another eco-friendly alternative

A green – literally and figuratively – alternative to Eco Flo is Pelaspan loose fill. These are made from 100% recycled EPS material and are ideally shaped to fill up all the voids in a box. The interlocking shape provides perfect protection especially for heavy or odd shaped goods.

This loose fill Is coloured green for easy identification. The chips are dust free, easy to dispense and can be reused. Supplied in a 15 ft³ bag, measuring approximately H 1200 x W 700 x D 525mm, weight 1.7 kg.

Foam blocks: what they are and when to use them

To put simply, foam blocks are literally blocks of foam. While foam sheets, rolls and foam profiles are good at padding and cushioning goods; for items such as furniture, electricals and glassware. For products requiring more protection – to secure and brace, this is where foam blocks come in to play.

Foam blocks come in a range of sizes but can be cut to whatever size and shape you need

Foam blocks are unbreakable blocks made from closed cell polyethylene foam and are CFC and HFC free. Available in a range of sizes from 300mm by 200m blocks for stabilising smaller objects, or up to 600mm by 600mm for larger goods such as furniture. But can be cut down to the size – and shape – you need for your specific goods.

Self-adhesive foam blocks for firmly holding things in place

These self-adhesive foam blocks act as blocking pads that stick to the inside of cartons and protect the contents from movement or damage. Supplied in sheets, where one surface has a permanent adhesive protected with a peel off backing. The foam pads are pre-scored; just snap them off the sheet.

The foam pads are manufactured from non-abrasive closed cell foam density of 35 kg/m³ and are available in two different foam block sizes and three thicknesses and come in two sizes, 50x50mm and 100x100mm and 3 thicknesses, 12mm, 25mm and 100mm.

Foam blocks can also be anti-static for packaging sensitive electronics

Foam blocks also come with antistatic properties for packaging, identifiable by its pink colour. Antistatic foam blocks are perfect for transporting electro-sensitive items such as electronics, printers, computers and more. They are designed to dissipate electrostatic charge and, even after several uses, remain effective and retain their shape.

Available in a range of sizes, these blocks can also be layered between goods to absorb shocks.

Protective polyurethane ‘egg boxes’ are ideal as a linerHere is another type of foam block, foam liners…

Designed with preformed contours, protective polyurethane foam wrap liners; this reusable foam padding, also referred to as an “egg box” foam because of its appearance, is ideal for lining cartons and boxes. The foam liners (use one on the bottom of the box and one on the top) surrounding your product and cushioning it from knocks and bumps. The ultra-protective foam liners fit closely together stabilising the contents.

Foam wrap rolls: what they are and when to use them

Foam wrap rolls is foam, on one continuous sheet, that has been simply rolled up. Where blocks are excellent for packaging to prevent movement and to provide cushioning, foam wrap rolls are ideal as a wrapping medium. Also acting as a type of foam padding roll it is designed to wrap around and between products, offering a padded layer to protect from abrasion and provide cushioning.

Foam packaging, foam wrap rolls

Such foam wrap rolls are ideal for any items needing gentle cushioning against each another, by interleaving. The smooth and soft texture, is also perfect for glass or polished wood as they are lint and dust free. The white finish provides a clean look.

Manufactured by Jiffy from up to 35% recycled pre-consumer resin to produce a closed cell polythene foam with a density of 20 kg/m³, these flexible and lightweight foam padding rolls are available in a variety of thicknesses, and wraps easily to conform to a variety of products.

Foam wrap sheets: what they are and when to use them

Foam packaging, foam wrap sheetsFoam wrap sheets are sheets of foam that is pre-cut to size, ready to use, as sheets. Foam wrap also comes in handy padding foam sheets, which are 1mm thick and pre-cut. This will save time when packaging: just grab a sheet and wrap. Made from up to 35% recycled pre-consumer resin to produce a closed cell polythene foam with a density of 20 kg/m³. This flexible and lightweight foam wraps easily to conform to a variety of products and comes in three sheet sizes: 230x280mm, 300x420mm and 500x500mm.

These sheets of packaging foam wrap are great to wrap around items that need to be protected from smearing and scratching. Foam wrap sheets are also handy for putting around individual items that are going to be packaged into boxes for storage or delivery.

Want to know more about our wide range of packaging foam?

For additional advice on packaging foam, foam wrap, sheets and blocks, our Packaging Experts are here to help you find the right solutions and arrange next day delivery. Simply call us on 0800 542 44 28 or visit www.rajapack.co.uk.

Can de-cluttering bring Brits a better life?

The de-cluttering craze is everywhere right now; as the focus of countless self-help books, the mainstay of many organisation gurus – and even the subject of a popular Netflix series. It’s also been the inspiration behind motivational quotes like Marie Kondo’s: “Discard everything that does not spark joy”.

This philosophy is a popular one: the promise that we can maximise our lives with a minimalist lifestyle. But, by putting our old belongings into cardboard boxes and bidding them farewell, can we really put more meaning into our lives?

We wanted to find out what Brits make of this movement, and whether they’ve felt a benefit from a purge of their possessions. To do this, we surveyed over 1,000 respondents on their attitudes to de-cluttering food, fashion and technology products in their homes.

How much are Brits wasting on food, fashion and technology?

RAJA de-cluttering: How much do Brits waste per year

First, we had to determine if there was a need to de-clutter. The answer? Yes.

We found that, on average, Brits are wasting a quarter of the food, fashion and technology items that they buy in one year.

Altogether, that’s over £400 that could be spent elsewhere (and that’s not including the space they could be saving, too!). How would you feel about an all-inclusive weekend away, giving more generously to charity or simply splashing out on family and friends? There are plenty of ways you could use this spare cash – and all without accumulating any waste.

On the topic of waste, what, if anything, are Brits doing with their old belongings? We discovered that 19% (almost one in five Brits!) do not de-clutter at all – which is 5.2M if we applied this figure across all over-16’s in Britain. Do many of us simply hold the habits of a hoarder, or is there another reason we cannot let go?

Why are we holding onto our old belongings?

One of the main reasons that respondents said they didn’t de-clutter is because they’re emotionally attached to their belongings (20% of Brits say so). For many of us, our sense of self is wrapped up in our possessions. Whether our ‘things’ remind us of past relationships or help bring back fond memories of childhood, the sentimental value of certain items often outweighs the cost. Surprisingly, more millennials hold emotional attachments to their belongings than other generations, going against the assumption that they choose experiences over “things”.

Finally, not fully understanding how to dispose of or recycle our food, fashion and tech is a major factor that stops us from saying goodbye to our things. Over half of the British public (51%) say they don’t know how to confidently dispose of their tech, crowning this as the most complex thing to de-clutter correctly, followed by fashion (41%) and food (38%).

How can we breathe new life into old belongings?

RAJA de-cluttering: What do Brits do with their old belongings

And yet, 4 in 5 of us do de-clutter – so what are we doing with our “stuff”?

It turns out Brits are a charitable lot, with over half of respondents (55%) donating their pre-loved possessions to charities and over a quarter of them (26%) are handing down their belongings to friends and family.

Brits are crafty with their possessions, too. We found out that 37% either recycle or upcycle their products –both of which help your belongings go further for longer. Recycling helps turn waste into a reusable material or product, while upcycling turns waste into something of a higher quality than before. Whether it’s turning a ladder into a bookshelf or restoring a bicycle to get it back on the road, many of us are breathing new life into old belongings – and pocketing ourselves with some profit to boot.

Our findings showed that 3 in 10 people are profiting from a side hustle by selling their old belongings, with almost three quarters of 35-54-year olds getting rid of their things this way. With popular selling sites such as eBay, Amazon and GumTree, as well as product-specific sites such as Depop, MusicMagpie and Vinted, there’s plenty of avenues to make some money off our belongings.

How does de-cluttering make Brits feel?

RAJA What are Brits' attitude towards de-cluttering

So, how do we feel when we de-clutter? We asked the 80% of people that said they actively de-clutter at least once per year.

Feeling house-proud is somewhat of a fuel for us Brits. Over half of respondents were motivated to dig out their and de-clutter when they wanted to free up some space, with 34% of them doing it to improve the presentation of their homes and 16% taking this task on when moving home.

We asked Brits to tell us the emotions that they felt when fulfilling this duty, and, although 1 in 10 said that it evoked negative feelings such as distress or feeling overwhelmed, the responses were namely positive:

  • 35% said they find de-cluttering to be a therapeutic experience
  • 27% found it rewarding
  • 16% said they de-clutter because it is beneficial to their mental health

When Brits de-clutter their home, they’re also de-cluttering their mind and gaining some emotional benefits.

Want to feel great too? Here are our top tips

Has all of this inspired you to de-clutter your home? Or perhaps you do de-clutter, but are in the quarter of Brits that admit to simply throwing things away when you do? There are many benefits that can come from de-cluttering, and even more so when you do it right.

De-cluttering is a popular trend, but our environment transcends any fads – it’s our future.

With that in mind, here are some of our top tips on how to de-clutter in a way that is sustainable and gives our belongings added life.

RAJA de-cluttering: Almost 20 percent of Brits do not de-clutter their home

So, next time you’re debating whether to de-clutter, consider the benefits that it can have to your wellbeing, your home, the planet (when done properly) and perhaps even your profits. Why not prepare for your next big clear out with our huge range of quality cardboard boxes for all your sorting and storage needs, and the great news is that they’re made from a minimum of 75% recycled contents.

RAJA Group unites its European RAJAPACK businesses under the single brand RAJA

The RAJA Group, Europe’s leading distributor of packaging, supplies and equipment for businesses, announced that its 15 European companies, formerly known as RAJAPACK, have now been united under the single European brand, RAJA.

With a presence in 18 countries and 1,900 employees, the RAJA Group has served its customers for 65 years, providing packaging, supplies and equipment. RAJA has made a name for itself as a leader in its markets thanks to its culture of customer service, its focus on innovation and the expertise of its employees.

In 2018, the French Group posted turnover of €631 million, almost 50% of which was outside France, and served 420,000 European customers of all sizes and from all sectors of activity.Rajapack is now RAJA

A European brand

Harmonising these brands will make RAJA more easily identifiable to its customers throughout Europe.  “The RAJA brand is a promise we make to our customers on the flawless quality of our products and services, on our close relationship with our customers and our environmental and societal commitments”, says Danièle Kapel-Marcovici, RAJA Group CEO.

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici, RAJA Group CEO

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici, RAJA Group CEO

With a presence in the UK since 1998, RAJA UK is based in Ridgmont, Bedfordshire and employs 100 people.

“We belong to the RAJA Group and the customer is at the heart of our strategy. We will continue to develop our market share in the UK and we have every confidence in the future” says Tom Rodda, Managing Director of RAJA UK.

Higher targets and a promising outlook for 2019 

In 2019, the RAJA Group will be pursuing its multi-channel development strategy throughout Europe. “We want to keep on providing customers with more innovative, personalised and eco-friendly solutions. We are bolstering our product offering, logistics and organisation to achieve our growth and profitability targets.  These investments should allow us to reach around €690 M in turnover in 2019”, says Danièle Kapel-Marcovici.

These ambitious targets will be driven by the development of Key Account customers, particularly in the dynamic e-commerce sector, as well as by investments in digital technology and improved logistics.

The RAJA Group, Europe’s leading distributor of packaging

*15 European companies

Belgium, the Netherlands, Great Britain, Germany, Spain, Austria, Italy, the Czech Republic, Switzerland, Norway, Poland, Denmark, Sweden, Portugal, Slovakia.

 

Posting parcels to your customers

Posting parcels to your customers

For shipping and deliveries within the UK or internationally, businesses can either use the Royal Mail or a courier to send their postal boxes, pallet loads or even items in small mailing bags – if they do not have their own dedicated fleet. For small businesses it is convenient to ‘pop it in the post’, or for larger businesses to arrange shipping and deliveries with couriers.

Unfortunately accidents can happen, if any damages occur during transit it’s likely that the retailer can be found accountable – despite it necessarily not being their fault. It might also mean retailers may have to incur the costs associated with the order.

As far as the customer is concerned, they placed an order from your business and they received a damaged product, regardless of it leaving your warehouse on time, and in tip top condition.

A happy online shopper is one that has received their delivery in the post, and of course, as expected. We are captivated by videos and pictures of unboxing or when a parcel is perfectly packed – who wouldn’t want to share their latest purchase.
Posting parcels to your customers - a happy online shopper

However, if a delivery is delayed or if the parcel is received in poor condition, this would probably result in a very unhappy shopper. And this customer is likely to share their disappointment on social media with a sad or angry Emoji, instead of a smiley cheery face.

In such a competitve market, customers are spoilt for choice and are not afraid to return their orders and look elsewhere.

Whether you have your own fleet of delivery vans, or not, here are some pointers to help you improve the efficiencies of your delivery and to help ensure a happy customer.

#1 Deliver directly to letterboxes

When the size, weight or value of goods permit, use envelopes and mailing bags or postal boxes that can fit through post boxes or letter boxes.  Online retailers can improve efficiency by using letter-box design available packaging suited to products, but also, to reduce costs. This also decreases the number of touchpoints that could go wrong before it safely reaches the customer’s hands.

Benefits to the customer:

  • No missed delivery and redelivery needing scheduled
  • No parcels left in unsecure places or left outside and subjected to adverse weather conditions affected by the weather
  • No misshaped or unpresentable parcels from oversized packaging

Benefits for the retailer:

  • No additional postal costs from using packaging too large for the size of the product
  • No unnecessary or additional void fill needed to protect the product
  • No admin time rescheduling deliveries and drivers redelivering parcels
  • No storage space needed to hold the redeliveries

Royal Mail letter, parcel and postal tubes sizes

Source: Royal Mail

The European standard EN 13724:2002 standardises the size of letter boxes across Europe, this ensures all post within the set dimensions can be successfully posted through customers’ doors. Unfortunately, the UK did not adopt this regulation1 meaning letter box dimensions do slightly vary. Despite this, to increase the deliverability a business must adhere to the strict postal size and weight restrictions letters and parcels from the Royal Mail and the UK standard delivery information from the Post Office, and also, make sure the efficiency and the quality of the packaging is the most suited.

#2 Efficient and quality packaging

You won’t have as much control over the journey and conditions of your deliveries if you use a delivery company. To help the success of your deliveries, some steps can be taken such as understanding how to use packaging labels and hazard labels, informing the carrier how the parcel should be handled or even making sure the parcels are sealed correctly by knowing how to use packaging tape. Even if your business has its own delivery vehicles – you can still benefit by making sure the most effective and appropriate packaging is used.

Efficient and quality packaging

  1. To reduce packaging costs: Insert your measurements into our box finder or bag finder, and the right sized cardboard box or bag will be displayed. Meaning, products will not shift in packaging that’s too big, no extra void fill needed to fill spaces, or damages from the loose-fitting packaging – which will also make the parcel look unpresentable.
  2. Innovative packaging materials: Simplify packing with multi-purpose and versatile packaging materials. Packaging with integrated protection, such as mailing bags with adhesive strips (no tape is required), foam postal boxes, with protective inner foam lining or book boxes, will completely wrap around securing the products.
  3. Custom-made and bespoke packaging: Designed to fit specific products so packaging dimensions can be maximised. Bespoke packaging also reduces the need for additional packaging, as with most bespoke packaging the protection is included into the design – preventing contact with the main outside packaging layer and the product itself.

For advice on your packaging operation, contact our Packaging Specialists on 0800 542 44 28, or email sales@rajapack.co.uk.

1 https://www.safe.co.uk/safezone/2011/09/the-european-standard-for-letter-boxes/

Can all paper bags be recycled?

Paper bags are increasingly seen as an environmentally friendly means of packaging – they are made from trees, they can be readily recycled and they can even be composted. However, not all bags are equal. We take a look at which kinds of paper carrier bags can be recycled and which composted, as well as finding out how to do it.RAJA Paper bag

Can all paper bags be recycled?

Pretty much all paper carrier bags can be recycled because they are, well, made of paper. This can either be bio-degraded or can be pulped and turned into new paper carrier bags.

Increasingly, people are questioning “are plastic bags are recyclable?“. Many people are turning away from plastic bags in search for an environmentally-friendly alternative. But are paper bags environmentally friendly?

Yes, these bags are extremely environmentally friendly. Paper can be easily recycled, so long as it is free from things such as plastic coatings, ink and other contaminants. If it is unadulterated from its original form, then they can usually be recycled.

So how can brown paper bags be recycled?

Brown paper bags

Such bags can be recycled in many ways. ‘Recycling’ of paper covers many things. From being pulped and turned into new bags to shredding for use as filler in other packaging products. It can also involve being turned into cardboard, or it can even mean being composted or bio-degraded.

In this article we shall find out all you need to know about recycling paper carrier bags.

Are paper bags compostable?

Most paper sacks and bags are compostable. Composting is a very important part of the recycling paradigm. Unfortunately, not everything can easily be collected and returned to a processing plant to be pulped and made into new paper.

So are brown paper bags compostable? Basic, unadulterated brown paper can be composted and this offers an energy efficient way to extract environmental value from used bags. Using a mixture of both brown and green materials are important. Plain brown paper, cardboard and dead leaves in combination with grass clippings and kitchen waste, are perfect ingredients to fuel composting. This can then be spread on your garden or allotment.

Are greaseproof paper bags recyclable and can you compost paper bags that have a grease proof coating? In short, yes they are recyclable and, in fact, they can also be composted as well as recycled, so long as they are treated with organic waxes.

Those bags that are plastic lined or treated with other chemicals are not so easy to recycle or to compost. Plastic – particularly polythene – can be recycled. However when attached to paper to line or coat a bag, separating the paper and the plastic is a problem. While both can be recycled, they are recycled in very different ways so have to be treated separately.

How to recycle a paper bag

Plain brown paper carrier bags with folded handles

Bags like this  – that are made only from paper – can be recycled, reused or composted

Are paper bags sustainable? Since they are recyclable and/or compostable, these bags are highly sustainable, as they can be reused in numerous ways.

Are paper bags recyclable? Yes they are. Recycling bags made from paper depends on how you wish to use them. As we have seen, they can be composted or pulped, or they can be repurposed or reused, both as bags or for other projects.

To recycle paper containers into paper, the bags must be shredded, boiled and turned back into paper pulp. This can then be pressed to remove water and to bond it together and rolled out into new sheets of paper. This can then be used to make new bags and other paper goods – or used more thickly to make cardboard.

Recycle

To recycle bags that have been ‘waxed’ is slightly more complex. These types of paper are considered in the recycling business as mixed paper and are not usually recycled – and so they have to be composted.

Organic wax such as soya bean wax can be digested by the worms and microbes in a composting process. However some other waxed papers are also treated with petroleum-derived additives which can be poisonous to microbes and worms. Unless you look deeply into the exact nature of the waxing on a particular bit of paper it is hard to know for sure if it can be used.

That said, as part of mixed organic waste going to compost, most waxed paper doesn’t in reasonable quantities cause problems.

Plastic coated bags or packaging used for milk or juice cartons are also mixed materials, but these can be recycled.

Bags that feature handles made of a material other than that of the bag can also be problematic to recycle. Although, so long as they are bio-degradable handles made of card or string – attached with organic glue – these bags can be composted.

How to compost paper bags

How to compost paper bags with RAJA

Composting is becoming an increasingly popular way of dealing with many household goods – particularly food and other organic waste. And these bags, as we have seen, if they are the right kind of paper, can be readily composted.

So how do you compost these bags? On a domestic scale, you simply need a compost bin in your garden, you can buy or build a compost bin. Just fill the bottom with garden waste such as soil, leaves and grass cuttings, then start to add your compostable waste. Did you know that kitchen scraps are ideal! Then as the worms and microbes in the bin start to digest it you can start to add other material such as paper and card. Not too many as it take the creatures in the bin a while to digest, but digest they will.

This will leave you with a lovely rich soil additive that you can use to help fertilise your garden – to grow vegetables. And the scraps of which you can put back in the compost bin to help digest more paper.

How to reuse paper bags

Large capacity strong paper bags

Large industrial paper sacks can also be reused and up-cycled

The other way to recycle paper sacks is to reuse them. Grocery shopping bags can be used more than once, assuming they haven’t been torn or damaged or been spilt on. Other forms of paper sacks and bags used in industry settings can also be reused – not least as rubbish bags.

Ultimately, paper containers can also be used to collect organic waste waiting to be added to the compost bin or taken away by the local authorities to be recycled.

Paper sacks can also be used as packing material to protect delicate items or used to line all manner of pet trays and other things around the home.


Guide: How a paper carrier bag is made

Find out how>>


Want to know more about the wide range of paper sacks and bags?

For additional advice on environmentally friendly paper products that meet all your packaging and gifting needs. Our Packaging Experts are here to help you find the right solutions and arrange next day delivery. Simply call us on 0800 542 44 28 or visit www.rajapack.co.uk.