Category Archives: Packaging Innovations & Technology

5 Amazing Pieces of Cardboard Furniture

Have you ever sat on a cardboard chair? If not, now may be your chance: a new trend of cardboard furniture has arrived with many companies producing high end pieces. Anything can be made out of cardboard, from beds and sofas to chairs and toys. We’ve included five of our favourite furniture collections below.

It might seem odd, but cardboard furniture is designed to be more environmentally friendly than MDF (Medium Density Fibreboard), which is the most common material used in flat-pack furniture. Using recycled paper and cardboard has less of an impact on the environment than MDF (a product which usually contains toxic formaldehyde resins) and can be constructed by almost anyone; most kits just need to be slotted together.

There are many advantages of using cardboard; it’s tougher than you’d imagine and can carry a great deal of weight. Despite concerns about water-resistance, cardboard actually dries quickly and most spillages can be treated by a quick reactions with an absorbent cloth. It can also be painted, adding an extra level of protection from moisture.

1) The Karton “Counting Sheep” Bedroom

Counting Sheep

This bedroom from Australian company Karton includes a bed (with under bed storage), a chest of drawers and a little sheep. The bed is strong enough to comfortably carry the weight of two people, and its robust construction means it will last.

All this comes for only $449 (around £250) — including the sheep!

 2) The “Chairigami” Arm Chair

Cardboard chair

This sleek geometric armchair is the product of the talented folks over at Chairigami, a US-based company that produces cardboard furniture.  This chair will add sustainable style to any home!

 3) The “Bravais” by Lazerian Studio

Cardboard chair

This limited edition chair (only 50 were made) has unfortunately sold out, which should come as no surprise when it effortlessly mixes geometrical intricacy with an environmentally-friendly conscience.

4) The “Chick ‘n’ Egg Chair” by Responsive Design

Egg chair

The Chick ‘n’ Egg Chair by Responsive Design can be made to any size for either parents or children, and its corrugated cardboard construction means it’s easy to move around the house. It’s also beautifully designed. It may look complex, but the construction has been refined and perfected to be as simple as possible.

 5) “Riki Kid’s Set” by Metrocs

Riki Kid's Set

This set by Japanese company Metrocs is a multipurpose education tool for young children. It features two stools and a table that can be easily deconstructed and packed away. The surface is durable and designed to be drawn on, making this set perfect for younger children. It’s available online for ¥6,800 (about £38) before postage.

With so many amazing and interesting designs out there, now is the time to invest in cardboard furniture. If you want to, you could even make your own, with this incredible guide from Adrian Candela and faircompanies.com:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IaSXJOGiuk

Uber Taxi Set to Shop

Does Amazon have a new business to compete with? With the popular taxi hailing app, Uber branching out, Rajapack takes a look at its new delivery service.

If you hadn’t already heard, Uber is an app-based taxi service originating in San Francisco. The app connects the driver to the passenger, organising taxi hire at the lowest possible cost. It has proved particularly successful amongst Londoners.

 Introducing Uber Essentials

Currently being trialled in Washington DC, the Uber Essentials service offers an inventory list of around one hundred items ranging from sweets to ping pong balls that users can order to their door. The full shopping list can be found on Uber’s official Corner Store. Although it’s a fairly limited stock list right now, a form on Uber’s site allows you to request other products that are missing from the list.

New York Taxi Photo

 New York Taxi by Craig Cloutier

How does it work?

Though it’s just in the planning and trial stages right now, the service is simple to use:

  • ‘Toggle’ your Corner Store option (which will be available Mon-Fri 9am-9pm).
  • Set your delivery location and confirm your address.
  • Meet your driver and place your order.
  • No cash needed. You will only be charged directly to your Uber account.

UberEssentials Picture

What does this mean for the packaging industry?

This is changing delivery and packaging by the day, with companies competing with each other more than ever before due to the growth of ecommerce. Market leaders are catering to the demands for longer opening hours, faster communication and bespoke services, all delivered fast!

For now, the battle between Uber and its competitors is one to watch. eBay offers a same day delivery service that could potentially disrupt Uber’s attempts, for example.  Though Amazon packages its own items itself, both Uber and eBay could be looking to external packaging options and innovations.

Power Sellers – significant sellers on eBay – may also take advantage of Uber’s new service by making sure they’re prepared with shipping materials like envelopes and other mailing items. Access to constant packaging stock would not only improve the seller’s business efficiency, but also the customer’s overall experience.

What’s next?

Not only is Uber offering sweets and games, they have also partnered with Vaccine Finder offering UberHEALTH on a one-day trial in America. Through Uber Health, a registered nurse will come and give taxi users a flu jab for free. By partnering with different companies, Uber has managed to increase its reach whilst dominating ideas for personal delivery service, far beyond just catching a lift.

Although in its early days, Uber is showing a clear head start in its goal of supplying and serving customers in a personal and immediate way. If the initial trial is a success, then waiting up to a week for deliveries will surely become a thing of the past.

The Cardboard Tech Revolution

We live in a decade where technological innovation is pretty commonplace – everyday there’s something new. The news is full of stories of fresh ideas for everything from entertainment to medicine. There always seems to be a sleek new machine being made or a more advanced material being used. But after a little research, Rajapack have discovered that even something as established as cardboard is getting its time in the technological limelight.

Don’t believe us? Well, we’ve gone out to find the most impressive new technologies that use cardboard and some of the things we found may surprise you.

Google Cardboard

Google Cardboard

Image: Google Play

Continue reading

Ask the Experts: Could Volvo’s Roam Concept Revolutionise Home Delivery?

In late February the internet was awash with speculation around Volvo’s sneak preview of their pioneering home delivery concept Roam. Rajapack gathers some expert opinions on whether Roam could really revolutionise the way we receive our online shopping.  

It’s an all too familiar sight for many of us, coming home to stumble over that cardboard slip containing the words “Sorry we missed you”. As well as being an awkward inconvenience, it’s also a problem that creates a huge financial burden on the courier businesses, estimated to have cost the industry £820 million over the last year alone. Volvo believes its latest Roam concept, which was officially unveiled at Mobile World Congress this year, could be the answer to all of these troubles.

The Technology

Volvo's Roam

Roam works by utilising Volvo’s existing ‘On Call’ technology, transforming a customer’s car into a parcel drop off point and by doing so removing any need to alter your schedule around expected deliveries. Couriers are provided with a digital key that allows access to the car’s GPS co-ordinates, colour, registration plate and grants one time entry to the car, allowing the courier to drop off the goods. Once deposited, the car then re-locks and sends an acknowledgment message to the customer, notifying them their parcels have been delivered.

Continue reading

Rogue Logistics: the Amazon Big Box and Other Delivery Stunts

With more promotional demos popping up from Amazon, Rajapack looks at a few of the more creative packaging and delivery based stunts from the past few years and answers a few key questions; for example, how many Amazon “Octocopters” would it take to lift the recently delivered “giant box”?

Amazon are at it again: earlier this year an enormous parcel with the Amazon logo printed on the side was spotted in a Wisconsin street – arguably one of the biggest boxes anyone’s seen in a long while. What could they possibly have been delivering? Thinking about Amazon products, it could be anything: 900 books, 1000 DVDs, a pair of scissors, endless second-hand digital cameras – anything. Not many people could figure it out, until it was later revealed that inside the giant box was…..a car. It was a Nissan Versa Note in fact – part of their ambitious advertising campaign which allowed customers to purchase the car by clicking a link on Amazon, with a selected few having their vehicles delivered inside the big box.

rara

To be honest, some of us preferred the mystery. But after the big reveal, many were left wondering what Amazon were going to do next; first we see automatic drones delivering directly to the customer’s door, and now this.

Continue reading

Ask the Experts: are Automatic Drones the Future for Package Delivery?

With Amazon’s parcel drone demo still fresh in our minds, Rajapack gets some expert views on whether delivery by automatic drone is really as close as we think.

Back in December a small robotic delivery-copter flew out from a product depot with a parcel strapped to it and headed to its destination; it then carefully placed the package down on to the patio of an eager customer who was waiting a few miles away. There was no knock on the door, no slip of paper saying “sorry, we missed you”, and no van waiting outside with the engine still running. There was very little human involvement at all.

The automatic parcel drone in question had “Amazon Prime Air” written on the side – it was a recent demonstration by the online giant showcasing their game-changing drones (or “Octocopters”) that fly directly to a customer’s home to deliver a package in thirty minutes of the order being placed.

Amazon-copter

Amazon’s Chief Executive Jeff Bezos says that the drones can carry items of around 5lbs (which accounts for most of the products bought on Amazon) and insists that they will be able to deliver those parcels in the promised half hour.

It’s bold and it’s impressive, but is it the first step towards a world in which endless Octocopters sail overhead while you’re doing the shopping? Could the flying robots soon be as commonplace as other technological paradigm shifts, such as the UK’s giant web of power lines that dominate the countryside? Well, it might not be that simple – there are a number of challenges to face before this idea really inserts itself in to the normal running of society.

Continue reading