Tag Archives: charity

Has 2020 changed the meaning of Christmas?

It’s been a crazy rollercoaster of a year. Marked by a global pandemic that has put the planet on hold, 2020 has separated so many of us, while simultaneously bringing others closer together.

There’s no doubt that this year has made many of us reassess what matters most. But where do we stand when it comes to Christmas – has it become irrelevant in the grand scheme of things? Or showcased just how special the festive season truly is?

Last year, in the world that existed before Zoom calls and social distancing, the nation said gifting was still the way to give love. Yet, as our lives have changed and priorities shifted, is there still a place in our hearts for tinsel, trees and gift boxes? We wanted to explore Brits’ buying habits in light of this life-altering year, as well as how people are feeling in the lead up to Christmas. We surveyed 1,000 Brits across the UK, and here’s what we found out.

Has 2020 changed the meaning of Christmas 1

The act of giving still matters…

Of respondents who expressed an opinion, 84% of the nation has agreed that Christmas 2020 will be different for their family and themselves this year. Cities such as Liverpool (94%) and Cardiff (92%) (who have undergone some of the harshest forms of lockdown) reported feeling this the most.

And with the rules around Christmas being so uncertain, it seems there are some traditions that we’re desperate to cling onto. Enter: the giving of gifts. In fact, only 8% of Brits surveyed won’t be doing this, meaning that the majority of the population are still undertaking pressie procuring in some form or other this year.

Has 2020 changed the meaning of Christmas 2

It seems that the physical element of a present matters now, more than ever, too. Compared to last year’s survey, the amount of people who would feel guilty about not sending a physical gift has increased by a margin of 3%, taking it to a total of 21%. Of those that would feel guilty, the two key reasons given were a) because physical gifts feel more thoughtful (44%) and b) because it’s important the recipient has something tangible to unwrap (32%). Could this mean that while the act of giving has always mattered, it means that little bit more this year?

…but how we buy will be different

Has 2020 changed the meaning of Christmas 3

We also found that, understandably, our buying habits are shifting. It comes as no surprise that affordability is the biggest priority for Brits this festive season, with over 39% listing this as a factor they will consider when shopping. A third of the nation (33%) will be tightening the belt straps and spending less than they usually do (females more so than males), which is twice as many people as those spending more than normal.

As well as affordability, there were some other interesting insights as to what factors people will consider. Naturally, with online shopping up by 43% year-on-year at the end of October (according to Capgemini’s Online Retail Index), this looks set to continue into our festive shopping sprees. 34% of the British public said they’ll need to consider being able to shop online or from home this festive season and, perhaps more remarkably, this trend is consistent across all age demographics.

Last year, we were told that 18% of the population had been deterred from choosing a gift based on its environmental impact. This year, the same percentage of people picked eco-consciousness as a key consideration for choosing gifts, though shopping locally is taking higher priority. Thanks to the many commendable campaigns that have fought for the estimated 6 million small businesses (and 16.6m jobs) that are in a financially precarious position this year, over 1 in 5 people (20%) now say that this will be a factor in their gifting choice.

Finally, you may remember that the dawn of lockdown brought a boom in crafts, from masks for frontline workers, to knitted dolls of Captain Sir Tom Moore. In fact, John Lewis reported upticks in haberdashery sales, while the likes of Hobbycraft reported a 200% boom in online sales since lockdown began. It seems that those aged 16-34 are leaning into this revolution even further this festive season, with a whopping 34% saying they’ll want to make their gifts by hand.

Recipients still want something tangible to open…

Has 2020 changed the meaning of Christmas 4

Ultimately, we’re still a sentimental bunch when it comes to having something tangible under the tree to open.

Last year, we asked people if they would prefer either a physical or digital gift (such as an e-card, e-voucher, or e-gift), and found that people preferred physical gifts by a margin of 29%. This year, it has ever so slightly increased, perhaps as our yearning for ‘normality’ grows.

Interestingly, for those who said Christmas would be different this year, they preferred a physical gift by a difference of 38% (8% vs. 47%). Yet for those expecting a similar Christmas to normal, the preference for physical gifts was far smaller, with a difference of only 19%.  Again, could this be a sign that for those whose Christmases will be out of the ordinary, a physical gift can act as an anchor amid an uncertain year, and a way to feel closer to our family and friends?

This isn’t to say the younger generation aren’t turning the tables, however. While all ages have a significant preference for physical gifts, younger people who would prefer a digital gift have grown by a margin of 5% this year. In fact, for 16-24-year olds, the difference between their preference for physical gifts vs digital is closing at only 8%, compared with 32% for over 25-54s, and 38% for 55+s! If things were to continue on this trajectory, by 2023, digital gifts might have become the chosen gift for Gen-Zers.

…even if emotions on Christmas are mixed this year

Has 2020 changed the meaning of Christmas 5

While the year has undeniably brought many lows, we have seen some positives from stronger relationships to new innovations and flexible working.  We wanted to know if 2020 has been more negative or positive for Brits personally, compared to recent years. 40% said more negative, 17% said more positive and 35% said about the same. But, what about peoples’ feelings towards the festive season, specifically?

We asked respondents to express any words that come to mind when thinking about the upcoming festive season. Among the words most used by those expecting Christmas to be different this year ranged from ‘family’, ‘lonely’ and ‘depressing’ – while for those expecting it to be the same, it ranged from ‘indifferent’ and ‘awful’, to ‘hope’, ‘together’ and ‘eating’.

One Christmas optimist told us,

“Christmas is the look of joy on the faces of my grandchildren as they open up their presents and it’s exactly what they want. It’s the twinkling lights on the tree, the soppy Christmas films on TV, the hefty lunch. It’s the ‘You shouldn’t of’, ‘Oh, that’s lovely’ and the classic, ‘You know me too well.”

And yet, there’s no ignoring the hardship that this year has brought about for so many. We heard from a lot of people worrying about a whole host of things this year, from loneliness and isolation, to financial pressures.

“Loneliness, anger, depression, feeling like the worldwide community has yet again something to disagree with each other about (C19).”

I just want to treat it like another day. I can’t cope with all the stress it brings due to financial circumstances.”

Can you still spread some festive cheer?

So where do you stand on Christmas this year? If you love giving, and are in a position to contribute towards a smile this Christmas, here are just a few ways we can all help those that may need it most:

Checking in on the elderly people in your community: As we know, the elderly are in the most vulnerable category across a range of factors – and a recent Age UK survey found that those over 65 often feel invisible or ignored. Whether it’s taking the time to write a Christmas card to elders in your building or offering your assistance to someone who can’t do their shopping, do your bit to make sure they’re noticed.

Putting together a gift box: There are many charities that organise shoe box appeals, such as Operation Christmas Child. However, there may also be other organisations local to your area doing a similar thing, on a smaller scale. Look out for neighbourhood Facebook groups or regional charities close to your home that may be looking for gift boxes and presents to put together for those feeling the strain.

Fight for food banks: Use of food banks are at a record high this year, with The Trussell Trust reporting a 61% increase compared to last year. There are many ways we can help, from volunteering our time to fundraising or making regular donations. You can visit The Trussell Trust website to see a list of ways that you may be able to offer something.

While 2020 has brought a lot of uncertainty to our lives, what is certain as we approach the festive season is the importance of family, friends, community, and togetherness. Whether you’re spending the festive season in isolation or with loved ones, try to reach out to those around you. After all, what can be closer to the true meaning of Christmas?

RAJA’s Lockdown Challenge to Portugal

The RAJA UK team have set their sights on walking, running and cycling their way to the furthest RAJA Group office in Europe. At a challenging 1,500 miles away from the office in Bedford, the RAJA Portugal is the destination, but not before they stop off at the headquarters in France first to say Bonjour! They have 2 weeks to reach this ambitious target and all the miles means more money – as they fundraise for the Milton Keynes hospital charity and the Bedford Hospital Charity to support the NHS with the fight against COVID-19.

RAJA Lockdown Challenge Miles to Portugal

On Friday 24th April the lockdown challenge begun. The team tied those trainers, jumped on their bikes and filled those water bottles as they set off outside for their daily exercise – making sure they keep to Government guidelines.

Here’s how you can support the RAJA team’s Lockdown Challenge between 24th April and 7th May, and help fundraise for the NHS,  Milton Keynes hospital charity and Bedford Hospital Charity

Milton Keynes Hospital Charity - JustGiving Bedford Hospital Charity & Friends

All the money raised by the employees at RAJA will be matched by RAJA UK.

 Thank you for your support.

RAJA takes on The 2.6 Challenge

Eloise Edgar 26 cookies The 2.6 Challenge for Road Victims Trust

Eloise Edgar baked 26 cookies for the Road Victims Trust

UK charities are facing closures due to fundraising events being cancelled from COVID-19. RAJA’s employees have virtually come together to participate in the The 2.6 Challenge on Sunday 26th April 2020, when the 40th Virgin London Marathon would have taken place, and when some of our employees would have joined the thousands of runners on the streets and bridges through London. Organisers of the biggest mass-participation sports events across the country united to create the 2.6 Challenge to raise the vital funds needed and to help save the UK’s charities from the estimated shortfall of £4 billion as a result of the pandemic.

Spurred on by the determination of our runners this challenge was set to every team at RAJA to complete their individual challenge in support of their own chosen cause. And what a great response! The team rallied together – and with family members – by completing their goal and to raise money for their chosen charities. By the looks of it – what fun they had!

Highlights from The 2.6 Challenge

Here are some snaps from the weekend. Some baked, biked and blitz cleaned their houses, whilst others ran, rambled and rallied their family together for a quiz.

Vicky Baker galloped 2.6k, raising over £180 for MIND

Vicky Baker galloped 2.6k, raising over £180 for MIND

Afsar Parker ran his first half marathon, also supporting MIND

Afsar Parkar ran his first half marathon, also supporting MIND

The 2.6 Challenge

Sian Creegan appreciated the sights and supported Action for Children, whilst Amy Skingsley took on 26 questions, supporting Hula Animal Rescue

Karen Phillips supported Willen Hospice and St Nicholas Hospice Care

Karen Phillips supported Willen Hospice and St Nicholas Hospice Care – although we would have liked to have seen photos from the haircut!

Amy Tyers and Marianne Aitken biked for their charities

Amy Tyers (left), rode 26 miles for the Alzheimers Society, and Marianne Aitken (right) managed 2.6 meters instead of the 26 laps with Maxi in the basket, for Cats Protection

Andrew Wood and Phil Spratling got active for The 2.6 Challenge

Andrew Wood (left) and his daughter ran 2.6 miles and raised £110 for Cats Protection, Phil Spratling (right) scootered 2.6 miles with his children for Myeloma UK

And what appears to be the toughest challenge of them all…

Sophie Jamieson embraced staying at home and achieved all 26 jobs from her spring cleaning To-Do list – what an impressive accomplishment! She endured this long task for the Spinal Injuries Association.

Sophie Jamieson spring-cleaned for Spinal Injuries Association

All the fun and games, not to mention hard work was to support charities that were close to people’s hearts, here are just some of them…

The 2.6 Challenge at RAJA - charity donations

Inspiring women, inspired to give

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici, businesswomen and philanthropist

The history of the packaging company RAJA, is an empowering family story that spans over 60 years. One of courage, dexterity and determination.

The packaging industry is still regarded as a male dominated industry, and especially after World War II during the time of a male led society – the everyday struggles women encountered were overlooked and were socially accepted. Despite this, two women saw an opportunity and instead of letting the economies of post-war France and businessmen deter them, they persevered.

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici, the RAJA Group

Inspiring women

During the Second World War, Rosie the Riveter was the iconic feminist symbol (and still is) of the female wartime workforce which was the turning point for women. Although the typical gender roles meant that post war, women were expected to give up their industrious jobs and, naturally return to their housekeeping duties.

In 1954, Rachel Marcovici and her friend, Janine Rocher founded Cartons RAJA in France. The concept was simple, resell used cardboard boxes, not only was it cheaper but it meant reusing what materials were available. Rachel organised the business operations, sought meetings with buyers, negotiated and made the deals. She was a successful women in business and an established business owner that carved out a flourishing profession in the packaging supply and distribution chain.

Since then, a lot has changed but what has remained strong throughout the company are the ethics of a businesswomen and the key foundations which continue to this day.

Today, Danièle Kapel-Marcovici is the CEO of the company, now called RAJA Group (the headquarters is still in France). She is the daughter of Rachel Marcovici, and has successfully continue to grow the company with the same passion as her mother. Now RAJA has presence in 18 countries throughout Europe, with 21 subsidiaries of a turnover of more than €631 million in 2018. The RAJA Group has more than 1900 employees, and this year recently acquired Staples Solutions business units in France, Spain and Italy. The RAJA Group will have 3,000 employees and will have an expected turnover of €1 billion.

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici - the RAJA packaging headquarters

Inspired to give

In 1982, when Danièle’s parents entrusted her with the family firm, she not only continued her mother’s journey in the business world, but with the same beliefs to seek equal rights for women all over the world.

Influenced by her mother’s life, Danièle’s views came to realisation in 2006 when the RAJA-Danièle Marcovici Foundation (known as the RAJA Foundation) was founded. Dedicated to the empowerment of women around the world, the organisation has since supported over 440 female-centric charity projects in more than 50 countries. More than 90,000 women have benefited from the activities of the RAJA Foundation, and it has also dedicated over €9 million for its cause.

Danièle shares her opinion on why the feminist movement matters, the need for corporations to balance business with philanthropy, and her vision for the foundation.

As the CEO of a for-profit corporation, what inspired you to start a charity?

I have always been a committed woman to such causes and, since the 1970s, have led a personal and shared struggle for feminist awareness. Women should be free to choose, have the same rights, the same recognition and the same status as men in society.

I also believe that, in addition to their economic role, companies have a role to play in the society. That is why I created the RAJA-Danièle Marcovici Foundation in 2006, under the aegis of the Fondation de France (a French philanthropic network), to support organisations that work for the empowerment of women and the improvement of their living conditions.

The foundation supports projects throughout the world that contribute to women’s education, social action, abuse and violence against women, training and professional integration. The RAJA Foundation was one of the first in France to commit to this cause, and it’s funded by the RAJA Group.

Danièle Kapel-Marcovici

There are many groups in the world that need help. Why does the feminist movement in particular mean so much to you?

Women are the first victims of inequality in the world. They perform two-thirds of international work but earn only 10% of the income. 70% of people living on less than 76p (€0.89) per day in the world are women, and one in three women is a victim of violence during her lifetime.

It is essential to support actions that empower women and reduce the inequalities they face. Women need equal access to education and to professional opportunities; they deserve the same pay and the same freedoms as men. Investing in equality is the best investment for achieving global political stability and economic development.

How can a for-profit corporation uphold and support the values of its not-for-profit activities?

Since I took over the leadership of RAJA Group from my mother when I was 36, I have led the group with respect for professional and wage equality between women and men. The company refuses all forms of sexism and has strong values of solidarity and respect.

The social commitment of RAJA Group reinforces the purpose our employees feel in their professional lives. In 2013, I created the programme RAJApeople, which allows employees to get involved with the RAJA Foundation in different ways.

An employee can choose to have their salary rounded up to the nearest euro so that the difference between this and their actual salary becomes a monthly micro donation that goes to the foundation.

They can also volunteer with the foundation, sponsor a project, or take part in events that are organised throughout the year.

The company also organises events in France and in our European subsidiaries on 8th March, which is International Women’s Day, and November 25, International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

Most recently, we were a partner of the first feminist eco-festival in France.

Why is the fight for women’s rights still necessary in developed regions?

SOL - RAJA Foundation

Any progress made is still too slow and uneven, and political will and financial support remain inadequate. The movements launched in 2017, such as Me Too, have highlighted that the problem of violence against women remains a reality in many countries – even in France.

In 2017, one French woman was killed every 2.8 days by her partner or ex-partner, yet only a third of them were identified as victims by the police or those close to them.

In addition, the news constantly shows that many rights remain to be won and those that have been obtained are regularly challenged in an era marked by the rise of individualism, conservatism and obscurantism.

In authoritarian regimes, war and even any questioning of democracy, women are the first to be affected and their rights are the first to be ignored. In Europe, many countries are now questioning women’s right for abortion by limiting it or making access difficult. A few of those countries are Ireland, Poland and Spain.

Saveurs en partage - the RAJA Foundation

Even in France, where men and women are said to have equal rights under the law and its application, there is still a gap and the conditions for female emancipation are far from being fully acquired.

What aspects of the fight for women’s rights continue to require attention?

Women continue to suffer discrimination and violence regardless of their age, nationality or religion. There are still women who are not allowed to drive, who are excluded from inheritance or the right to own land. Girls are deprived of education simply because of their gender and, in some regions, are still being forced into arranged marriages.

Acting to improve the status of women around the world remains a priority for me. The RAJA Foundation will continue its mission to advance the rights of women in France and in all regions for the world for as long as inequalities persist.

GERES - the RAJA Foundation

In contrast, what are some of the changes that deserve to be lauded?

There has been some progress made and the status of women has improved in many respects in both developed and less developed countries. When my mother was young, she was not allowed to vote. When she founded RAJA Group in 1954, women were still not allowed to open a bank account or practise a profession without permission from their husbands. At the beginning of my career, there was no law that guaranteed equal pay for women and men for work of equal value. Now, all these have changed.

What are your goals for the foundation in the next five years?

My ambition is to make the RAJA Foundation a think tank for women’s rights. I have committed the foundation to three complementary missions – to financially support relevant projects, involve the employees of RAJA Group as well as to denounce, inform and contribute to advocacy to overcome inequalities. As part of the last mission, the foundation develops women’s rights awareness programs that it shares with different audiences.

I also launched the RAJA Women’s Awards in 2013 to promote and commend exemplary actions and projects taken and led by the organisations with whom the Foundation works. I aim to facilitate the exchange of experiences among all those involved in the feminist cause to improve the effectiveness of actions and to contribute to the development of everyone involved.

The Foundation will continue to support the organisations it works with and encourage our employees to get involved in its activities. I want its voice to be heard on different platforms where gender issues and women’s rights are discussed, at both national and international events.

Raising awareness of the Foundation is also a priority. It has a website (fondation-RAJA-marcovici.com) where we present the organisations and projects that we are supporting. RAJA Group also communicates regularly with its network of suppliers, customers and other stakeholders about the foundation’s activities.

What are some of your most memorable moments with the RAJA Foundation?

Every RAJA Women’s Awards ceremony, where more than 400 people gather to recognise exemplary projects carried out by different organisations supported by the foundation, is emotional for me.

My visit to Northern India in 2017 with an organisation that the foundation has supported for many years is also a highlight. I was able to meet local women as well as the renowned female Indian scholar and environmental activist Vandana Shiva.

Interview source: theceomagazine.com

The search is on for 10 Rajapack Animal Protectors!

This winter, people up and down the UK will be working hard to give vulnerable animals the food, shelter and care they need. To celebrate their great work, we’ve started to search for ten amazing people to be named Rajapack Animal Protectors!

rajapack-animal-protectors-3

Our top Animal Protectors will win an exciting Reward Box. These special boxes will be tailored to the winner and filled with £100 worth of products to help them continue caring for animals. Inside could be anything from animal feed or wellies to scratching posts and grooming brushes; it’s up to our winners to decide which pet products can help them continue doing their fantastic work.

How do the awards work?

If you know a person or organisation who has gone out of their way to care for animals, then head over to the Animal Protectors nomination page and tell us why they deserve to win.

No creature is too great or small to need protection, so we’d love to hear stories about people who care for any animal from butterflies to bulldogs or birds of prey, however we can only accept entries for non-profit organisations. So you can nominate an individual, charity or sanctuary, but not a vet or pet groomer.

Rewarding protection

It may seem strange for a leading packaging company to honour Animal Protectors, but as our products are used to protect valuable items, we admire others who take protection as seriously as we do. Last winter we teamed up with Tiggywinkles, the world’s busiest wildlife hospital, to build Hector the hedgehog a house. We raised over £350 for the charity and also donated £220 worth of stationery to their busy offices. As part of our core values we look to always put something back into society and this is one way we can make a difference.

It’s easy to nominate your Animal Protector today

If you know someone who deserves a big thank you for their great work, why not take five minutes now to nominate them and make sure they get the recognition they deserve.

New Rajapack catalogue launched and it’s changing lives

September marks the launch of Rajapack UK’s new 312-page packaging catalogue. Inside will be over 280 brand new packaging solutions to ensure your products reach your customers safely, plus we’ll be including eco-friendly packaging alternatives to help your clients answer their customers’ growing demands for environmentally responsible packaging.

The catalogue is being delivered right now, so expect yours in the post any day. If you haven’t ordered from us before, click the banner below to request your free copy.

Request the new Rajapack catalogue

Choose eco-friendly packaging and together we can change lives

Along with fresh packaging ideas, the new catalogue also focuses on the belief that ‘Together we can change lives’. Built on two of Rajapack’s core values: environmental responsibility and supporting charitable causes, we’re launching an action programme for Women & the Environment.

Women and the Environment

By simply ordering from a selection of 12 eco-friendly products, our customers can help women across the globe. For every one of these products bought between September and February 2016, we’ll donate up to £3 to help fund five community projects around the world.

These projects help women living in countries such as Cuba, Togo, Mozambique, Myanmar and India, to grow their own produce and build better lives for themselves and their families.

As you order at rajapack.co.uk, you’ll see a running total of money raised, and the difference your order will make to women around the world.

You’ll find full details about this great Women & the Environment project in the new catalogue and on rajapack.co.uk, plus we’ll be publishing information and videos right here on the blog.

Maximise your sales with environmentally responsible packaging

With eco-friendly packaging fast becoming a key factor for your customers, over the coming months we’ll be posting a number of useful articles highlighting the best ways for your business to be environmentally responsible.

Plus, following the launch of RajaPrint, our online custom printing service and online chat, our live chat service to provide advice, we’ve been working on more tools that will make buying packaging online even easier. So keep an eye out for these new features on rajapack.co.uk

If you have any questions about any of the above, please give us a call on 0800 542 44 28.

Helping Communities – Celebrating International Women’s Day

The Raja-Daniele Marcovici Foundation

“The entire Raja Group marches for women’s rights!”

Raja Group employees marched for international women's day.

To help and support this year’s International Women’s Day, all employees across the 18 companies under the Raja Group umbrella have taken part in a week long mobilisation for Women’s rights.

All 1500 employees were given a free pedometer for the campaign, organised by the Raja-Daniele Marcovici Foundation, with the goal of achieving 15 million steps.

The attempt was made in support of the Life Project 4 Youth charity, which is currently helping young mothers in the slums of Manila and Jakarta. The charity helps young people living in these slums  build better futures for themselves and their families.

Since 2009, 500 young people have been supported by the Life Project 4 Youth, but with many living in vulnerable conditions in these slums, the charity is in vital need of help and support from organisations such as the Raja-Daniele Marcovici foundation.

That is why we are proud to announce that the Raja Group have incredibly met that goal of 15 million steps and therefore a generous donation of €15,000 has been gifted to the LP4Y by the foundation.

The Life Project 4 Youth charity at work.

This is an incredible amount of money for a charity which does such important work in some of the toughest environments in the world. To put it into context, 15 million steps between 1500 people equates to an average of 10,000 steps (5 miles) per person.

However, The Raja-Daniele Marcovici Foundation’s support of the Life Project 4 Youth charity has not started and finished with the March for Women’s Rights week. Since 2012, the foundation has supported two centres which specialise in the education and support of young, unmarried mothers.

In that time, the centres have helped over 50 young mothers to learn key entrepreneurial and production skills which will allow them to have control over their lives and build futures for themselves and help lift the communities out of poverty.

About the Raja-Daniele Marcovici Foundation 2006-2015

Founded in 2006 on the initiative of Daniele Kapel-Marcovici, CEO of the Raja Group, the Raja- Daniele Marcovici Foundation supports community projects for women in France and around the world. It campaigns for women’s rights, the fight against violence against women, education and training, professional and social integration.

To find out more about the work of the Life Project 4 Youth, watch the video below.

Tiggywinkles charity campaign comes to a close

We hope you’ve been following our Home Safe Home campaign over the last few weeks.  We’ve had a lot of fun building Hector’s mansion and raising money for such a worthwhile charity, but sadly all good things must come to an end.

As of today, the final total raised for Tiggywinkles Wildlife Hospital is a huge £351.46!

Thank you!

We’d like to say a big thank you to all our kind donors and everyone who’s followed our campaign on social media. We hit five targets giving Hector the hedgehog a house, sky dish, garage, garage extension and west wing extension.

Despite our £1,000 target being a little out of reach, our cardboard constructors were having so much fun that they went ahead and built the full mansion anyhow!

You can see all stages of our mansion building below:

Hedgehog-Mansion-Gif

Whilst our charity campaign has come to a close, the work at Tiggywinkles Wildlife Hospital continues. When the nurses and veterinary surgeons are hard at work treating injured hedgehogs, birds and reptiles, the office team are busy keeping up with admin.

To help them out, we’ve also donated over £220 worth of stationery and packaging.

We hope you’ll continue to support Tiggywinkles and keep an eye out for our next charity campaign.

Hector’s mansion grows and so does our fundraising!

Since our last blog entry just three short days ago, we’ve had huge support for our Home Safe Home campaign!

We’ve now raised over £290 for Tiggywinkles Wildlife Hospital and our team of cardboard constructors have added a garage and garage extension to Hector’s mansion:

Hedgehog mansion stage 4

Hector’s cause has been a big hit on social media too and he’s even had a mention from comedienne, Pam Ayres.  We’d like to say a big thank you to all our kind donors and followers.

Help us support Tiggywinkles

This incredible charity is totally reliant on public generosity. Each year they treat over 10,000 hedgehogs, deer, badgers, foxes, wild birds and reptiles who have been injured, before releasing them back into the wild.

It’s great to see so much support for such a worthwhile charity and we’re really looking forward to seeing what next week holds.  Will we raise enough to give Hector a west wing extension?

We hope so!

A great start for our charity campaign – and Hector’s mansion!

It’s been an exciting few days since we launched our Home Safe Home campaign to support Tiggywinkles Wildlife Hospital. If you missed the launch, see it here.

Thanks to our generous donators we’ve raised over £100 already which means we’ve smashed our first and second milestones and Hector’s house has now got a sky dish!

Hedgehog mansion stage 2

The more we raise, the bigger the difference we can make

Tiggywinkles is completely reliant on donations from the public. Each year they treat over 10,000 sick or injured animals free of charge. Hedgehogs, badgers, deer, wild birds, foxes and reptiles are brought in by the public as casualties and the staff at Tiggywinkles nurse each one back to health before releasing them into the wild.

Please help by donating as much as you can

To help Tiggywinkles treat all their patients this winter, we want to raise £1,000. We’re donating packaging and we’d love you to help us reach our target. It’s quick and easy to make a donation at our Just Giving page.

As Hector’s mansion grows we’ll post updates our blog and you can see how much we’ve raised over on our website.