Tag Archives: women

Beating the Bias – Women in Leadership

From tech giant IBM appointing its first female CEO in 2011 to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences increasing the share of women on the board, there’s no doubt women are breaking the glass ceiling in the world of business. In fact, the RAJA Group itself was founded as a two-woman company as far back as 1954. But as we move into a new decade, how much further do we have to go before gender equality in the workplace is truly equal?

In 2017, we challenged the notion of gender bias by unpacking the new female industrialists and speaking to a number of women making their mark in traditionally male-dominated industries. This International Women’s Day, we’re going one step further and taking a look at how far women have come in the fight for leadership positions and what work still needs to be done in 2020 and beyond.

Women in leadership: the current situation

In 2018, McKinsey’s Delivering through Diversity report showed the statistical significance of diversity in leadership. When it came to women in executive positions, the study confirmed that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on their executive teams were 21% more likely to have above-average profitability than companies in the fourth quartile.[1]

Yet according to our research, businesses are still failing to utilise the benefits that women can bring to leadership roles. The Office for National Statistics’ annual population survey shows that in 2010, only 34% of Managerial, Directorial or Senior Official positions within the UK were occupied by women. A decade on (with research up to 2018), this has only increased by a disappointing 1 percentage point to 35%.

This is particularly shocking when stats show us that over 50% of the UK population is comprised of women, making it even more conclusive that the ratio of women to men in leadership roles is not representative of the society that we live in.

A breakdown of women in leadership by sectors

A breakdown of women in leadership by sectors

By looking into the employment sectors stated by the ONS within the UK, we were able to dissect the data in more detail through the following categories: Agriculture and Fishing, Energy and Water, Manufacturing, Construction, Distribution, Hotels & Restaurants; Transport & Communication; Banking, Finance & Insurance etc.; and Public Admin, Education & Health.

The data shows that in half of the given sectors, less than a quarter of leaders are female. The sectors with the poorest performance in terms of female leadership are Construction (16% of leaders are women), Energy & Water (19%), Manufacturing (22%) and Transportation & Communication (24%). In addition, Banking, Finance & Insurance has historically been known for its Wolf of Wall Street-esque setting. And, although this 80’s depiction is a far cry from what it is today, it is troubling to see that still, only 34% of leaders in the sector are women. In fact, the only sector where more women currently hold these roles is within Public Admin, Education & Health at 57%.

Though all but one of the sectors included has seen an incremental increase in women in leadership positions from a holistic view from 2010 onwards, there is sadly still a low representation in traditionally male-dominated sectors, and in fact, most traditionally female-dominated sectors, too.

So, what can we do next?

Despite initiatives to promote equality in the workplace being championed across many businesses in recent times, there is still work to be done. In fact, a recent review of FTSE leaders shows results that are not only disheartening but shocking, too. Within the FTSE 100, around two thirds of all available leadership roles are occupied by men and, as of 2019, only seven of those CEOs were female[2][3]

So, what can all companies – big and small – do to ensure that we are beating the bias and benefitting from women leadership in every workplace? Here are just three ways we can do this:

  1. Transparency: By being transparent about diversity goals, we can show current employees and potential candidates that we are taking steps in the right direction. It means having measurable goals that tie into individuals, teams and groups, rather than just playing a numbers game for the sake of compliance. For example, it is not gender diversity if your workforce is proportionate, but you have an all-male board.
  1. Eliminating unconscious bias: Though we may not mean to be consciously bias towards women, a history of workplace prejudice has embedded a lot of stereotypes that mean we may not even know we are being influenced by. The best way to ensure this is controlled is to have rules in place that make processes subjective, from applications to training, reviews and promotions – particularly for leadership roles. 
  1. Modernity: By being open to reworking policies so they are inclusive – from flexible hours to modified work schedules – we can make certain we have the top pool of talent, rather than ruling certain demographics out. A lot of traditionally male-dominated industries have inflexible timetables but finding common ground which is geared towards a wider group of people will help businesses go a long way.

From striking for equal pay to securing classification as skilled workers, women have taken great strides in the fight for workplace equality. Yet sadly, there is still a perception that certain industries and roles are only suitable for men.

On Sunday 8th March 2020, we will be celebrating how far our society has come in terms of gender equality in the workplace, whilst also thinking about how we can continue to push for progress. To learn more, head over to our interviews with the inspirational women who are packing away stereotypes in corporate culture and showing value in male-dominated industries.

[Methodology: This research was conducted by analysing the Annual Population Workplace Analysis survey from The Office for National Statistics to work out the population of males vs females in Manager, Director and Senior Official positions within the UK. This uses their data ranging from 2010 to 2018.]

[1]https://www.mckinsey.com/~/media/McKinsey/Business%20Functions/Organization/Our%20Insights/Delivering%20through%20diversity/Delivering-through-diversity_full-report.ashx

[2]https://ftsewomenleaders.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/11/HA-Review-Report-2019.pdf

[3]https://www.statista.com/statistics/685208/number-of-female-ceo-positions-in-ftse-companies-uk/

RAJA interviews René Pierre: the female inspired football table creator to celebrate women in sport

It’s not just Bill Gates who started a business venture from his home. René Pierre, a French football and billiards table manufacturer began his entrepreneurial journey from his garage.

Women in sport, football table with female figurines

Along with the RAJA Foundation and the Women and Environment Action Programme, RAJA is committed to supporting the achievements and independence of women. So, to celebrate FIFA Women’s World Cup 2019 and women in sport, RAJAPACK UK has launched RAJACUP, a sports campaign that also offers our customer the chance to win a René Pierre football table.RAJACUP the Rajapack campaign to celebrate women in sport and FIFA Women's World Cup

This isn’t just any football table, it is crafted in France, and is designed by the manufacturer René Pierre. Sébastien Menneveaux, Key Account Manager at René Pierre takes us on a journey of Mr Pierre’s legacy.

Can you briefly introduce the company?

For nearly 70 years, René Pierre has been manufacturing football and billiard tables. It all started in 1952, when Mr Pierre built his very first football table, and now, René Pierre has retail stores throughout the world and employ approximately 50 people.

1953, the orginal René Pierre factory

 

Each year, more than 8,000 football tables and 2,500 billiard tables are shipped from the factory.

How did the René Pierre brand begin?

Mr Pierre was the son of a carpenter, and so naturally some of his father’s experience and knowledge influenced him and he became a woodcraftsman. He designed and built the first René Pierre football table from his own garage. After a busy year handcrafting and selling his football tables, in 1953, he built a small factory in Jura, France, to cope with the growing demand. This would be the home of the brand for a number of successful years.

In the 70s, a new and larger René Pierre factory was built

In the 1970s, a new and bigger factory of 8000 m² was built in Chalon-sur-Saône, France, which is where the factory still manufacturers the René Pierre football and billiard tables. The factory is currently under the watchful eye of Claude Pierre, current CEO and son of René Pierre.

Tell us about the first editions of the René Pierre football tables

The first productions of the football tables have become collector items, many customers contact us to restore their 1970s football tables, some tables have been purchased from an antique dealer or some have been passed on from generation to generation.

There is also a huge fashion trend of owning vintage and antique items, and we see a lot of our old posters that people have kept safe over the years as a memento – it’s retro and they can still be used as posters today.

Original René Pierre football table posters

Has the manufacturing process of a football table changed since 1952?

Yes and no. Even though we have invested in machines for cutting the wood, most of the football table production remains an intricate hand crafted skill.

Inside the René Pierre football table manufacturer

What type of customers order your football tables?

Today, almost all of our tables are purchased by individuals and communities such as schools, community centres and leisure centres.

We have experienced a recent phenomenon with start-up companies ordering our football tables for their break-out, games rooms or company waiting rooms.

What opportunities have sports events brought you?

Sporting events influence our business, it can inspire our designs and enable us to show our innovation and dynamism.

Do you design tables for particular sports events?

For every major football competition, we launch a limited edition range or special design models.

We also receive personal requests to custom make football tables to a particular design.

Let’s talk about FIFA Women’s World Cup, what made you decide to make a football table for this competition?

René Pierre football table inspired by FIFA Women's World Cup - Elles

As we tend to manufacturer football tables based on major football competitions this World Cup is no different, and especially as it is hosted in France, our home country. It represents women in sport around the world and promotes gender equality.

It was exciting to launch a football table called “Elles”.

What can we expect from you in the future?

I will quote from our company vision statement: to continue to provide our customers with enjoyable memories, while maintaining the qualities of a French manufacturer and the family values within the company!

Women in sport, football table designed with female figurines

To find out more of the company’s history, please visit René Pierre.